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Today's News

  • Man indicted for human trafficking

     Sun Staff

     

    A Lebanon man has been indicted for human trafficking in Washington County.

    Gery E. Childers, 26, was indicted by a Washington County grand jury last week on three charges: human trafficking (victim under 18), a class B felony, unlawful transaction with a minor 1st degree, a class C felony, and being a persistent felony offender, 2nd degree. Bond was set at $10,000 full cash. He is to have no contact with complaining witness. 

  • Kentucky not fully compliant with REAL ID

    You may have to produce more than your Kentucky driver’s license or ID card to enter some federal facilities in the near future, and if something isn’t done by Jan. 22, 2018, you won’t be able to board a plane without an acceptable form of ID, either. 

    Washington County Circuit Clerk JoAnne Mudd-Miller said the federal government has denied an extension for the commonwealth to come into compliance with REAL ID, a federal regulation on ID cards. 

  • Missing woman's remains found

    The remains of a woman who was murdered in Washington County have been found.

    According to Bath County Coroner Robert Powell, Crystal Warner has been positively identified after her remains were found in Bath County earlier this week. She was murdered with her boyfriend, Robert Jones, in July.

    Kentucky State Police said the remains were found under a brush pile and sent to KSP’s central laboratory in Frankfort for identification.

  • Commanders top Richmond Model

    The Washington County Commanders tipped off the regular season Monday night with a home game against Richmond Model.

    “You’ve got to be happy getting a “W” first game of the year,” Head Coach Bernard Smalley said.

    Smalley’s team jumped out to an early lead over the Patriots and were on top 16-15 after the first quarter. 

    The Commanders built on their lead and were up 36-33 at halftime.

    When the dust settled, Washington County came away with a 79-70 victory.

  • Holocaust survivor visits St. Dominic School

    Students at St. Dominic School got a lesson that can’t be taught in textbooks when Fred Gross, a Holocaust survivor, told them the harrowing tale that took him to hell and back as a toddler. 

  • WC volleyball falls in three sets to Central Hardin

    The Washington County Commanderettes (16-13, 4-3) traveled to Central Hardin High School last week to take on the Bruins, but they came up short against one of the perennial contenders in the 5th Region, losing in three straight sets (25-13, 25-14, 25-13).

  • Local man fulfilling goal as novelist

    Growing up about 20 miles outside of Pittsburgh, Frank Mazur knew he wanted to be a novelist.

    In fact, the blurb under his high school yearbook photo said: “Aspires to be a teacher and a novelist.”

    “I’d always been into writing, and I read a lot of novels, even in high school,” Mazur said. “That was something that always just kind of stuck with me.”

  • Brown, King vie for state legislature

    Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 7, and The Springfield Sun will be providing voters a closer look each week until the election at all of the contested races that will appear on this year’s ballot in Washington County. This series, which will be presented in a question-and-answer format, begins this week in the race for the 55th District state representative seat between incumbent Kim King and challenger Tobie Brown.

  • Search for Warner continues

    It’s been more than three months since Crystal Warner and Robert Jones were murdered in Washington County, and while a suspect is in custody and Jones’ body has been recovered, Warner’s remains have yet to be found.

    According to Warner’s mother, Mary Reeve, things have slowed down but the search continues.

  • Recycling center on the move?

     The wheels have begun to turn with regards to moving the county’s recycling center. 

    A committee was formed Monday morning during Washington County Fiscal Court’s regularly scheduled meeting to recommend a location that would be convenient for the county and cost effective for the court. The committee consists of magistrates Billy Riney and Hal Goode, along with former county attorney Hamilton Simms.