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Today's News

  • Local woman escapes crash

    Halloween night held an extra scare for one Washington County native this year, but it wasn’t the type of fright that anyone intentionally seeks out.

    Emily White, daughter of Keith and Carrie White of Springfield, found herself in a collision with a tractor-trailer and her car in flames, but she, fortunately, escaped the incident with only a few bruises.

  • Move-in could be reality

    Moving into the new Washington County High School building next month may be a reality with only a few hurdles left to clear, particularly receiving approval from Washington County Environmental Health.

    Architects from Ross Tarrant and representatives from Alliance, the contractor on the project, were in attendance at Monday’s monthly school board meeting, and the discussion centered around a recent visit by  the local health inspector.

  • Weather update: School board meeting location change

    With snowfall last night and this morning causing school districts around the area to close on Monday, the regularly scheduled Washington County School Board meeting will be held with a change in venue.

    The meeting was originally scheduled to be held at 7 p.m. at Washington County High School, starting with a share fair presentation from students.

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Hustle Points

    When Edwin Mendoza gets knocked down, he gets right back up again.

    He learned this type of mentality growing up in Washington County, a community he said was “an awesome place to be.”

    “It’s really nice to have been able to grow up here,” Mendoza said. “I’ve learned a lot of things here, and I’ve enjoyed it because it’s always peaceful and everybody knows everybody.”

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Fitting in Nicely

    Two years ago, when Mark Lunsford moved to Washington County from a small town in Oklahoma, he wasn’t sure what to expect.

    He was coming to an unfamiliar place to live with his dad, who had lived in Washington County all his life. Turns out, it was “pretty much the same stuff, different place.”

    And for Lunsford, that was a good thing.

    “In a small town, I really like how everyone’s really nice, and everybody gets to know everybody on a first-name basis,” Lunsford said. “It’s a nice place to be.”

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Quiet Commander

    As Qualyn Yocum hears the question, he takes a long pause before answering, and when he does, he answers it just as it is asked, in the minimum amount of words needed.

    Do you play any other sports than football?

    “Baseball.”

    How long have you done that?

    “Three years.”

    What is your favorite part about playing for the Washington County Commander football team?

    “We know how to work as a team.”

  • Sew This & That returns from Somerset

    Marion Mulligan and Rita Yates

    Our annual sewing trip to Jabez in Somerset was held during October.

  • News briefs for 11/12

    Ongoing

    Election Signs
    Washington County Recycling would like to remind everyone that election signs are not recyclable. People are asked not to put them in bins at the recycling center.

    Volunteers Needed

    Volunteers are needed at the Lincoln Legacy Museum. If you have any free time, even a couple of hours would be greatly appreciated. Call Lena at (859) 336-3232.

    Volunteers Needed

  • Library seeks new trustee

    The Washington County Public Library is governed by the Board of Trustees. It is comprised of five volunteers representing all areas of our county. Trustees come to their volunteer roles with a range of experiences and backgrounds, and a strong desire to ensure the long-term vitality of our public library.

  • A session in Brindisi

    Tom Logsdon left Springfield long ago, but when he did, he took the initiative to put Washington County on the map in the world of advanced mathematics and the aerospace studies.

    Logsdon, a 1955 graduate of Springfield High School, was born and raised by Stanley and Margaret Logsdon on Lebanon Hill in Springfield in a community that he describes as “a treasure swarming with cordial neighbors situated in the middle of a wonderfully friendly state.”