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Today's News

  • Raikes’ passion for FCCLA, teaching ‘an asset’ for WCHS

    When Sarah Raikes first arrived at Washington County High School in 2000, the family and consumer science program — then still being called home economics — was in trouble.

    There were only six members involved in the school’s struggling Family, Career and Community Leaders of America organization.

    But Raikes, who had spent the previous 13 years teaching what is now known as family and consumer science at Campbellsville High School, looked forward to the challenge of rejuvenating the program.

  • WCHS golf team readies for season

    The Washington County High School golf squad is just a week away from teeing off, and they’re already getting into the swing of things.

    Head coach Bobby Bartholomai said the team’s goal, this year, as it is every year, is for players to practice and improve their game, which is something they can take with them for the rest of their lives.

    “If you want to improve in golf you have to practice outside of playing,” Bartholomai said. “And that’s what I hope to instill in them.”

  • Friday accident turns fatal

    A two-car collision near Bloomfield on Friday turned into a fatality Monday morning.

    Several emergency crews responded to a two-vehicle accident Friday morning. The accident caused the drivers of both vehicles to be transported to the University of Louisville. The driver of the Grand Marquis, William Sympson of Springfield, was airlifted to the University of Louisville via Air Methods Kentucky. He died Monday morning.

  • Today in History
  • Judge-Executive Settles issues apology

    It opened with an apology.

    Before the pledge of allegiance and opening prayer, Washington County Fiscal Court and those in attendance heard an explanation and apology from Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles regarding the use of county employees to clean up the remains of a barn and attached garage fire located on magistrate Billy Riney’s farm on June 2. Riney was not present at the meeting and it was explained he was on vacation.  

  • Loretto man dies after falling from car

    A Loretto man died July 29, one day after reportedly falling from a vehicle on West Main Street in Lebanon. Tyler Hamilton, 24, passed away at University Hospital in Louisville where he was being treated for his injuries.

    “He was a big-hearted person,” Hamilton’s mother Carla Mudd Constant said. “He had love for everybody.

    “He had his demons that he fought, but he had love for everybody. He wanted everybody around him to be happy and to enjoy life.”

  • Backpack program looks to help youth

    In 2001, a group of Washington County 4-H students were looking to make an impact on local youth after attending a conference that helped them focus on studying certain issues in their communities that affected teenagers.

    The issue they eventually chose to tackle was helping to decrease food insecurity in school children.

  • Former chief of police passes away at 93

    Thomas Leroy “Roy” Fenwick, former chief of police in Springfield, passed away at Springfield Nursing and Rehab on July 19 at the age of 93.

    Fenwick, a U.S. Army veteran who served in World War II, was on Springfield’s police force from 1970 until 1987, and he held the position of chief from 1979 until 1987.

    His son, Danny Fenwick, served as a spokesperson for the family.

    He said it’s hard to summarize a man’s life in a few words.

  • High school schedule to see changes

    Hillary C. Wright
    Washington County Schools

    Washington County High School is starting the 2015-2016 school year by implementing a new hybrid schedule, one that is a bit more rigorous, but will offer several different areas of study.

  • Festival kicks off on Friday

    More than 12 years ago, then-Springfield mayor Mike Haydon wanted a celebration of the heritage of the local African American people that coincided with the Holy Rosary Catholic Church picnic.

    That idea blossomed into what is now known as the African American Heritage Festival, one of the largest festivals in the city and an event that returns to Springfield this Friday night.

    For Main Street Executive Director Nell Haydon, the festival is one of the most important — and most fun — events in the area.