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Construction date changed for Habitat House to accommodate volunteers

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By Nick Schrager

Steven and Carolyn Hash are Taylor County natives, but they are now proud to call Washington County their home. Soon, they will even be moreIn scheduling the construction date for the new Habitat for Humanity house for Steven and Carolyn Hash, organizers had originally set the dates for June 19-20, overlooking the fact those dates fell on Father's Day weekend. Now, the dates have been moved to June 26-27 to allow more volunteers to participate. For more information, contact John Wharton at (859) 481-4091. Below is the original story of the Hash family, and how they came to receive this year's house from My New Kentucky Home, an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity.

Steven and Carolyn Hash are Taylor County natives, but they are now proud to call Washington County their home. Soon, they will even be more proud to move into a brand new home in the county, courtesy of My New Kentucky Home, an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity.eeThe Hashes have faced numerous challenges in recent years, which started with serious health issues. Steven has battled diabetes and heart problems for several years, and only recently was released from the hospital, though he remains bedfast. Carolyn has also battled poor health, and between the two of them, they are no longer able to work. Now declared as disabled, Steven can no longer continue working at Classic Kitchens, a Campbellsville-based cabinet manufacturer where he had been employed for more than 17 years. Carolyn has worked several jobs, including her most recent where she operated a home-based care center for elderly women until the couple began to care for three of their grandchildren, but she is no longer able to continue in her work while caring for the children and her ailing husband.ee“My husband has God’s hand on him, there’s no doubt about it,” Carolyn said. “The doctors and God have brought him back. He has been in such critical condition, and they have told us he wasn’t going to make it so many times, it’s just amazing. He has a very strong will to live.”eeAfter Steven’s health continued to falter in 2007, the family faced mounting medical bills, and it was hard for them to live on his disability benefits. It was their daughter who convinced them to make the move from Campbellsville to Springfield in November of 2007, and Carolyn said they are glad they made that decision.ee“My daughter married a wonderful young man here in Springfield. I was missing her, and she was missing her mother. She needed help, I needed help, and this is such a wonderful small community,” Carolyn said. “The people here are wonderful, and the children have met so many people and have so many friends. They’ve really adapted well. With some help and a lot of resources here, we’ve been able to get along and manage through some rough spells by the grace of God.”eeThe Hash family continues to see the benefits of that grace. Upon the suggestion of a friend, Carolyn said she finally decided to complete an application for a Habitat for Humanity house in Springfield.ee“We’ve always done everything on our own and paid for everything, and we had never thought of it. I thought it was for the elderly, but not for us,” Carolyn said. “We have a nice house, but we’re not comfortable with all of us living in a smaller rental home, and we can’t afford to rent a home large enough for our family.”eeCarolyn said after applying, she really didn’t think much about the process, and she had put it in the back of her mind until she received a telephone call one day.ee“They called and said we had been chosen, and they probably could have heard me scream in the next county,” she said. “My husband was happy, and when the kids came in from school we told them, and they were ecstatic. We never dreamed something so wonderful could happen to us, but it did.”eeConstruction will begin on the house on Sunday, June 13, Carolyn said. That’s when the frame will arrive, and then the building of the home will take place on June 26-27. The work was originally scheduled to take place the previous weekend, but that was changed due to Father's Day, according to John Wharton of My New Kentucky Home.eeThe house will be about 1,400 square feet, and will feature four bedrooms and two bathrooms,Carolyn said.eeJames Gerton, president of My New Kentucky Home, said all Habitat for Humanity house recipients are chosen based on income guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.eeGerton said My New Kentucky Home was formed in 1987-88, and this year marks the 20th anniversary of the first house built by the group in 1990. Each year, a home is constructed for a family in one of the three participating counties, which are Washington, Marion and Nelson counties. Those counties are on a rotating schedule, and the last home built in Washington County was in 2007.eeGerton said volunteers for construction of the house are coordinated by the contractor in charge of the project, which is Adam Riley of Mackville. eeFor more information about My New Kentucky Home or Habitat for Humanity, or to volunteer to help with the Hash home, contact Gerton at (859) 336-7589 or Joseph Miller at (859) 805-0872.

proud to move into a brand new home in the county, courtesy of My New Kentucky Home, an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity.

The Hashes have faced numerous challenges in recent years, which started with serious health issues. Steven has battled diabetes and heart problems for several years, and only recently was released from the hospital, though he remains bedfast. Carolyn has also battled poor health, and between the two of them, they are no longer able to work. Now declared as disabled, Steven can no longer continue working at Classic Kitchens, a Campbellsville-based cabinet manufacturer where he had been employed for more than 17 years. Carolyn has worked several jobs, including her most recent where she operated a home-based care center for elderly women until the couple began to care for three of their grandchildren, but she is no longer able to continue in her work while caring for the children and her ailing husband.

“My husband has God’s hand on him, there’s no doubt about it,” Carolyn said. “The doctors and God have brought him back. He has been in such critical condition, and they have told us he wasn’t going to make it so many times, it’s just amazing. He has a very strong will to live.”

After Steven’s health continued to falter in 2007, the family faced mounting medical bills, and it was hard for them to live on his disability benefits. It was their daughter who convinced them to make the move from Campbellsville to Springfield in November of 2007, and Carolyn said they are glad they made that decision.

“My daughter married a wonderful young man here in Springfield. I was missing her, and she was missing her mother. She needed help, I needed help, and this is such a wonderful small community,” Carolyn said. “The people here are wonderful, and the children have met so many people and have so many friends. They’ve really adapted well. With some help and a lot of resources here, we’ve been able to get along and manage through some rough spells by the grace of God.”

The Hash family continues to see the benefits of that grace. Upon the suggestion of a friend, Carolyn said she finally decided to complete an application for a Habitat for Humanity house in Springfield.

“We’ve always done everything on our own and paid for everything, and we had never thought of it. I thought it was for the elderly, but not for us,” Carolyn said. “We have a nice house, but we’re not comfortable with all of us living in a smaller rental home, and we can’t afford to rent a home large enough for our family.”

Carolyn said after applying, she really didn’t think much about the process, and she had put it in the back of her mind until she received a telephone call one day.

“They called and said we had been chosen, and they probably could have heard me scream in the next county,” she said. “My husband was happy, and when the kids came in from school we told them, and they were ecstatic. We never dreamed something so wonderful could happen to us, but it did.”

Construction will begin on the house on Sunday, June 13, Carolyn said. That’s when the frame will arrive, and then the building of the home will take place on June 26-27. The work was originally scheduled to take place the previous weekend, but that was changed due to Father's Day, according to John Wharton of My New Kentucky Home.

The house will be about 1,400 square feet, and will feature four bedrooms and two bathrooms,Carolyn said.

James Gerton, president of My New Kentucky Home, said all Habitat for Humanity house recipients are chosen based on income guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Gerton said My New Kentucky Home was formed in 1987-88, and this year marks the 20th anniversary of the first house built by the group in 1990. Each year, a home is constructed for a family in one of the three participating counties, which are Washington, Marion and Nelson counties. Those counties are on a rotating schedule, and the last home built in Washington County was in 2007.

Gerton said volunteers for construction of the house are coordinated by the contractor in charge of the project, which is Adam Riley of Mackville.

For more information about My New Kentucky Home or Habitat for Humanity, or to volunteer to help with the Hash home, contact Gerton at (859) 336-7589 or Joseph Miller at (859) 805-0872.