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Agriculture

  • Squash and cucumber problems?

    There a few problems that have been showing up in gardens lately, specifically cucurbits.  This includes cucumber, squash, and melons. 

    Bacterial wilt is showing up sporadically and I am sure it’s going to hit many of you who have cucurbits in the next few weeks.  Bacterial wilt causes plants to wilt slowly over a few days; they freshen up at night and then wilt during the day and eventually wilt and die.  The problem is a bacteria that enters the plant and blocks the flow of water and nutrients.

  • Pest facts

    I found a couple of interesting articles in the Kentucky Pest News that I thought I would share with you this week.

    Cicada Killer Wasps Active Across Kentucky
    Mild-mannered female cicada killer wasps are active across Kentucky. They are intent on their tasks of
    1. Digging underground burrows and
    2. Provisioning themselves with paralyzed cicadas that will be food for their grub-like larvae.
    3. The wasps will focus on these tasks over the next few weeks, generally oblivious to the stress and anxiety that they may be causing.

  • Fresh summer corn

    Let’s keep our summer garden series rolling with another popular veggie: fresh summer corn.

    The season for corn is July through August.  Corn is low in fat and full of fiber and B vitamins. Look for ears of corn with green shucks, moist stems, and silk ends that are free of decay.  Kernels should be small, tender, plump, and should fill all the spaces in the rows.  When storing fresh corn, keep it unshucked, wrapped in damp paper towels, inside a plastic bag in the refrigerator until ready to use.  The shelf life is usually four to six days.

  • 4-H brings home honors

    Good work ethics need to be instilled at an early age.  Parents go about helping their children learn responsibility and to finish a job in many different ways from home chores to holding a local job to working on the family farm.

    In 4-H and many other youth organizations, seeing youth reach a goal through hard work and perseverance, is rewarding not only for the youth, but for the parents and other adults who may have supported those youth in their endeavors.  

  • Time for late summer seedings

    Many of you are preparing to seed or re-seed various forage grasses and legumes. Successful establishment of a new pasture or hay field does not come about by accident, but by attention to details. One of the important details is what variety or varieties you will use. We have a lot of valuable Kentucky-tested results available on grasses and legumes important to Kentucky. For our complete list of species and varieties, see your county extension agent or go to our website at http://www.uky.edu/Ag/Forage/ForageVarietyTrials2.htm.

  • State fair time in Kentucky

    A great way to complete your summer is with a family trip to the Kentucky State Fair.

    This year’s state fair will run Aug. 14–24.  Registration for many of the events and activities are due in July or early August.  Washington County 4-H members have one final opportunity to qualify exhibits for the fair on Friday, Aug. 8.

  • How to: tasty tomatoes

    Cabrina Buckman

    Let’s continue the summer garden series with a new vegetable of the week: tasty tomatoes.

  • What’s with the tomatoes?

    Have you strolled through the tomato patch this summer, and out of the corner of your eye, you spot that perfectly red, ripe tomato?

    You then rushed over to pick it, only to find that it was rotten on the bottom or blossom end.  You are not alone!

    Lately, I have been receiving calls about this strange disease, as some call it, and what to do about it.  Many want to know what to spray to stop it and many just want to know what is causing it, and if they will ever get any tomatoes to eat.

  • Increased cases of lower-leaf spotting

    County Phase I Funds
    This year, receiving information about our County  Phase I funds has been a real roller-coaster ride.

    We were told early in the year there wasn’t going to be any funds and then a few months later we were told our county would be receiving 42% of the funds.  

    Our County Phase I Board met the end of May. Since this would be a small amount of money they voted to roll the funds over to 2015.

    By doing this we would have a large amount of money to be able to serve more people next year.

  • 4-H hosts summer camp

    You can’t think of summer without thinking of summer camp.

    Early mornings and late nights and singing your way to meals; making new friends, but keeping the old; all are memories made over a week of summer camp.

    Last week, 35 Washington County campers and counselors attended Lake Cumberland 4-H Camp.

    During the week, campers had a chance to swim, go boating, shoot archery and rifles, experience climbing and zip lining during high ropes, learn teamwork in low ropes, compete in field games, complete crafts and, of course, Sally Down the Alley.