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Agriculture

  • Overseeding of pastures can be an effective tool

    Article from Dr. Ray Smith, University of Kentucky College of Aquiculture

    Overseeding of pastures is an excellent management tool that improves pasture production, forage quality and ensures a good ground cover the following year without major pasture renovations.

    Overseeding consists of planting seed in a field with existing grass cover in order to fill in bare patches and thicken the stand.

    It can be done over the entire pasture or limited to trouble areas.

  • Become a KY Master Gardener

    The Kentucky Master Gardener Program is set to begin at the Washington County Extension Office on Monday Sept. 8, 2014 at 1 until 4 p.m.

    We will meet on the following Mondays from 1 until 4 p.m.: Sept. 8, 15, 22, 29; Oct. 6, 20; Nov. 10, 17, 24 and Dec. 1. We will also have an all-day trip to Lexington to be scheduled once class begins. The Kentucky Master Gardener Program is a 14-week program taught by Horticulture Extension Agents and University of Kentucky Specialists.  

  • 4-H news and shooting sports results

    Over the next several weeks, the Kentucky State Fair and 4-H leaf collections will be two of the major on-going projects for Washington County 4-H.  

    As I write this column, I am getting ready to load the car to take 4-H projects to the fairgrounds to be judged. On Thursday, our 4-H country hams cured in our new ham house will be judged, and the 4-H members will present their prepared speeches.

  • Time to join or rejoin 4-H is now

    A new school year is here, and it’s a great time to join 4-H, the nation’s largest youth organization.

    This week, many Washington County students may have picked up an enrollment form to join or rejoin 4-H for the 2014-2015 school year.

    Each fall, youth must fill out a 4-H enrollment form indicating what activities or clubs they wish to participate in for the coming year.

    Enrollment forms may be returned to the extension office or to homeroom teachers to be picked up by 4-H.

  • Home-grown potato and onion storage tips

    If you are trying to get your fall garden started, you have probably run into a problem.  

    You need to harvest your onions and potatoes but now wonder what in the world you are going to do with them to keep them from spoiling before you eat them.

    Well, you are not alone. I have the same problem. I usually store them as best as I can and take my losses, but there are some things that can be done to increase the storage time for these vegetables.

    With potatoes, there is one thing to keep in mind.

  • Stable flies a pest for livestock

    The stable fly is a blood-sucker that looks like a house fly but has a piercing-type mouthpart that projects forward from the front of its head.

    Males and females feed on warm-blooded animals and humans, usually around the lower leg or ankles. They will also attack dogs, biting them mostly on the ears.

    Stable flies are not limited to barns and stables; they will rest around houses and attack people, too. Stable flies are strong fliers; they can cause problems at least two miles from their breeding sites.

  • WC youth perform well in 4-H Talk Meet program

    One of the largest fears for many people is public speaking.  

    Over the years, hundreds of Washington County youth have learned to conquer that fear through the 4-H Talk Meet program held in cooperation with the local schools.  

    For three Washington County youth this summer, they were able to take their public speaking skills to an even higher level with their participation in the State 4-H Communications Day.  

  • Squash and cucumber problems?

    There a few problems that have been showing up in gardens lately, specifically cucurbits.  This includes cucumber, squash, and melons. 

    Bacterial wilt is showing up sporadically and I am sure it’s going to hit many of you who have cucurbits in the next few weeks.  Bacterial wilt causes plants to wilt slowly over a few days; they freshen up at night and then wilt during the day and eventually wilt and die.  The problem is a bacteria that enters the plant and blocks the flow of water and nutrients.

  • Pest facts

    I found a couple of interesting articles in the Kentucky Pest News that I thought I would share with you this week.

    Cicada Killer Wasps Active Across Kentucky
    Mild-mannered female cicada killer wasps are active across Kentucky. They are intent on their tasks of
    1. Digging underground burrows and
    2. Provisioning themselves with paralyzed cicadas that will be food for their grub-like larvae.
    3. The wasps will focus on these tasks over the next few weeks, generally oblivious to the stress and anxiety that they may be causing.

  • Fresh summer corn

    Let’s keep our summer garden series rolling with another popular veggie: fresh summer corn.

    The season for corn is July through August.  Corn is low in fat and full of fiber and B vitamins. Look for ears of corn with green shucks, moist stems, and silk ends that are free of decay.  Kernels should be small, tender, plump, and should fill all the spaces in the rows.  When storing fresh corn, keep it unshucked, wrapped in damp paper towels, inside a plastic bag in the refrigerator until ready to use.  The shelf life is usually four to six days.