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Agriculture

  • Renovating hay and pasture fields

    If you have a less-than-productive grass pasture or hayfield, following a few simple renovation techniques could increase the field’s productivity. Some things you can do include planting a legume such as red clover, controlling pests and adding lime and fertilizer. Be aware though, some techniques require you to start as early as the middle of February.
    Adding legumes to pasture and hayfields has several benefits including higher yields, improved quality, nitrogen fixation and more summer growth.

  • Avoid stress that comes with the holiday season

    The holidays are here! It is a time that most of us think of family, friends, meals together, evenings of hot chocolate and cookies and brightly lit trees with gifts wrapped with big bows. It is also a time that many try to do too much and end up stressed and exhausted.   Children are home from school, family gatherings and a long list of shopping can seem to be more work than enjoyment. Here are some ways to relieve stress during the holiday season.

  • Deadline to join 4-H in 2013 approaches

  • Fruit and vegetable conference Jan. 7-8

    The 2013 Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference and Trade Show will have something of interest for all fruit and vegetable producers. This year’s event convenes at 8 a.m. on Jan. 7 at Lexington’s Embassy Suites Hotel and concludes around 5 p.m. on Jan. 8.

    Preconference activities on Jan. 6 include a Winemaking Techniques Workshop from 1- 5:30 p.m. in Seay Auditorium on the University of Kentucky campus; a reception and the Kentucky Farmers’ Market Association annual meeting; and a fruit round table discussion from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the hotel.

  • Cash receipts help project 2012 status

    This article just came out following the Kentucky Farm Bureau Convention and we wanted to share it with you all.

    Preliminary U.S. Department of Agriculture reports indicate Kentucky agricultural cash receipts for January through September totaled $3.6 billion, 10 percent higher than 2011’s record level for the same period. Despite weather impacts on yield and high feed costs, agricultural economists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture foresee 2012’s cash receipts in the state will total $5.3 billion.

  • Cooking makes great wintertime activity for kids

    When it is too cold to play outside, it is time to get creative inside. A great way to engage children is to help them cook something warm and cozy in the kitchen. Cooking is especially enjoyable for children because it requires using all five senses. They see the foods and prepare them with their own hands. They can hear foods popping or sizzling in the pan and smell the aromas. Finally, the best part is they get to taste their finished product.

  • Christmas reflections: Remember what matters most

    I know most of you are busy, especially now. You may have fun reflecting on what is really important at the end of this year and going into a new one. Many of you have heard and many of you know personally Dr. Gary Lacefield. He gets around a lot and I would like to share with you something he sent to the agents recently.

    What is really important?

  • Country ham project accepting members

    One of the fastest growing 4-H projects, the country ham project, will be accepting new members through Dec. 3.  Participants learn the history behind curing hams, the process of curing and actually cure two hams for their project. A contract must be signed by both the parent and 4-H member agreeing to follow the project guidelines, which include giving a speech at the Kentucky State Fair.  Contracts and the $55 fee are due to the Washington County Extension Office by Dec. 3.

  • Gifts for gardeners

    With about a month until Christmas, it’s time to start thinking about what to buy that special gardener in your life. If you aren’t a gardener yourself, it may seem difficult to buy a gardening-related item for an actual gardener, so I thought I would give you a few ideas to make it a little easier.

  • Forage prep tips for next year

    Forages are such an important part of our local agriculture that I thought I would mention a few reminders and a little information for you to think about in planning for next year.