.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • Agriculture is bright spot in recovery

    This article is from Craig Infanger, University of Kentucky ag economics specialist.  I thought it was an interesting article and would like to share it with you all.

    The U.S. economy is struggling to recover from the longest, deepest recession since World War II. Economic growth has been positive for four quarters, but housing foreclosures continue unabated, the FDIC has closed 118 banks this year, the unemployment rate remains stubbornly above 9 percent, and UK graduates are facing the toughest job market in memory.

  • Teen Leadership group learns about agriculture

    Teen Leadership Washington County held one of its monthly meetings this past Friday, Sept. 24, led by Roberta Hunt and the new community education director,  Dawn Pettus.  The special host this month was Rick Greenwell, the county agriculture extension agent.  To start the day, the group met at the local extension office for breakfast and a brief explanation of some ag facts and an overall agenda for the day.

  • 4-H Sharpshooters receive awards; show support

    The Washington County 4-H Sharpshooters had a successful weekend on Sept. 18–19 at the Kentucky 4-H Shooting Sports Competition.  Saturday’s event was held at the Bluegrass Sportsman Club outside of Wilmore, Ky., and included .22 rifle, archery, pistol, BB and air rifle and air pistol events.  Sunday’s trap competition was held at the Kentucky Wildlife Management Center outside of Berea. Washington County won a total of 36 trophies in the 22 rifle and archery divisions with several top ten scores in trap, pistol, rifle and archery.

  • Festival offers many contests, exhibits

    During the weekend of the Washington County Crossroads Harvest Festival, Oct. 1-3, the Washington County Fair Board will be sponsoring the county fair exhibits at the Senior Citizen Building.  

  • World Farm Animals Day is Oct. 2

    This information we just received and thought you would be interested in this opportunity to learn more about communicating with the general public along with your friends and neighbors.

  • Turn matter into compost

    It is the time of year where a lot of plant debris starts to pile up after a long growing season, and many of us want to turn that free organic matter into compost for next year’s crops.  There are several keys to making good compost, many of which I will explain here.

  • Pregnancy check your cows

    Provided by Dr. Les Anderson, Beef Extension Specialist, University of Kentucky.

    In last month’s Off the Hoof, I discussed the impact of heat stress on pregnancy rates.  Heat stress reduces conception rate to 30-35 percent and can result in fetal loss during the early stages of pregnancy.  Pregnancies can be lost between days 25-45 due to heat stress.  Both of these factors lead to low pregnancy rates.

  • 4-H'ers excel at the state fair

    Washington County youth that participated in this year’s Kentucky State Fair were very successful in both competitions and being showcased for their past year’s accomplishments.  Everyone who enters an exhibit looks forward to the opening day of the fair so they can check out the results and see what ribbon(s) they may have won.  Washington County 4-H’ers were no exception and this year Ann Thomas Fallis continued the tradition with winning class champion with her second year leaf collection and Grand Champion Forestry project overall.  All 4-H exhibits ente

  • Autumn season has begun; sign up for class

    It may not officially be fall until next week, but it sure is looking and feeling like it.  I have to admit I like the season change a bit, but the only thing I don’t like about fall is the fact that winter is next!  After traveling to Lexington this weekend I realized just how lucky we have been weather wise lately.  I received 3.5 inches of rain at my house on Friday and Saturday, which was definitely needed.  Areas just to our north got very little rainfall and many trees and shrubs are actually dieing from the Kentucky River area up into the Lexington area.&nbs

  • Concern with corn crop causing producers to harvest early

    Producers who haven’t started harvesting in this area, and those farther east, need to scout for problems, so they’ll know which fields to harvest first, said Chad Lee, grain crops specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    While far western Kentucky counties have experienced the most extreme heat and driest conditions this summer, the whole state has had above normal temperatures. Western Kentucky also has been abnormally dry, and other areas of the state have sections that are dry.