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Agriculture

  • Sharpshooters compete; Cox represents 4-H

    Emily Cox represented Washington County 4-H at the State 4-H Communications Day held July 10 on the University of Kentucky campus.  Cox presented her speech in the 10-year-old Talk Meet category winning a blue ribbon.  Cox will be in the sixth  grade at North Washington Elementary and is the daughter of Phillip and Crystal Cox.  This is her second year to reach the state finals in the 4-H Talk Meet competition.  To reach state competition, a Washington County 4-Her must first win on the school level before advancing to the county-wide 4-H Talk Meet event.  If t

  • Blister beetles feed on flowers, foliage

    Clusters of blister beetles are out and feeding on the flowers and foliage of a wide range of plants. They are most active in the morning and late afternoon, often moving to shelter during the hottest part of the day.

  • 4-H Sharpshooters gear up for state competition

    The saying “Practice makes perfect” has certainly been true for the Washington County 4-H Sharpshooters this summer.  The club has been successfully competing in several district-sponsored competitions, gearing up for the State 4-H Shooting Sports Competition that will be held Sept. 18-19. Results from the District 4 competitions and the Bullitt County contests are listed below.  

  • Corn pollination is a concern

    Blue mold continues to be an issue in Connecticut, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania as of July 12, with new reports coming in from western NC during this past week. Current forecasts from North Carolina State University indicate a low threat to Kentucky and surrounding areas from the known sources of disease. This information can be accessed at http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/pp/bluemold/ and then selecting ‘Current Forecast’. It seems that blue mold is beginning to creep westward, and may eventually reach the Commonwealth.

  • 4-H'ers win awards

    The summer continues to be a busy time for Washington County 4-H members.  From horse shows, cattle shows to shooting sports competitions and rabbit and poultry shows, our 4-H members continue to excel and receive many honors.  Over the next several weeks, especially leading up to the Kentucky State Fair (August 19-29) as many pictures and results will be included as possible.  A special thanks goes to The Springfield Sun for all they do to promote our youth and their achievements in our community!

  • Producers can apply for training, benefits

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) announced that it has certified a petition for asparagus and catfish under the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) for Farmers Program. Beginning June 25, 2010, U.S. asparagus and catfish producers nationwide will have 90 days to apply for training and benefits.

  • Bacterial wilt showing up in gardens

    There are a few problems that have been showing up in gardens lately, specifically cucurbits.  This includes cucumber, squash, and melons.  Bacterial wilt is showing up sporadically, and I am sure it’s going to hit many of you who have cucurbits in the next few weeks.  Bacterial wilt causes plants to wilt slowly over a few days; they freshen up at night and then wilt during the day, and eventually wilt and die.  The problem is a bacteria that enters the plant and blocks the flow of water and nutrients.

  • Blue mold risk low for Kentucky

    Continued hot and dry weather should help keep blue mold out of Kentucky. Forecasters at North Carolina State University project a low risk to our area from the currently known sources of disease in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. Even though the threat of blue mold is low now, keeping an eye out is never a bad idea when it comes to this disease. Historically, the first cases of blue mold have been reported in late June through mid-July, and our status could change should cool and wet conditions occur later on.

  • Meat prices reflect supply and demand

    Consumers may be in the driver’s seat when it comes to higher meat prices. Indications are that retail meat prices may rise to record highs later this year, according to a University of Kentucky agricultural economist, and it all rests on that bedrock of free market economics — supply and demand.

  • Forage producers need to watch for poison hemlock in hayfields

    Many farmers across the state have just made or will soon make their first hay of the season. While making hay, it is important for growers to notice and remove any poison hemlock from their hay or pasture fields.

    Native to Europe, poison hemlock is an invasive weed that was introduced as an ornamental in the United States during the 1800s. It is potentially poisonous if ingested by livestock or humans in both its vegetative growth stages and when dry.