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Agriculture

  • Regulator to increase pasture growth

    Some of you may have recently heard about a new plant growth regulator called RyzUp SmartGrass. It is being marketed to increase grass pasture production during late fall and early spring. The product is a formulation of gibberellic acid (often called GA). GA is a naturally occurring plant growth regulator that causes cell elongation in all plants and therefore is essential for plant growth.

  • Problems beginning to show in tobacco float beds

     A number of problems have begun to crop up in float beds around Kentucky, some related to the heat wave that took place back in April and others to the heavy rains that fell recently. Over the past week, we have seen a huge spike in reports of target spot along with a few cases of Pythium root rot. At the moment, the ‘strongest’ fungicide we can recommend for target spot is mancozeb (Dithane, Manzate, or Penncozeb).

  • Master Gardeners plant at arboretum

    I thought gardeners would be interested in reading this article written by Carol Spence.

    Within the space of a couple of hours on a day in mid-May, hints of Kentucky and splashes of whimsy materialized across The Arboretum, the State Botanical Garden of Kentucky. Flowers sprang up so quickly throughout the garden that one might suspect it was the work of garden fairies.

  • Farmers need to utilize flood relief programs

    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer advises that Kentucky farmers may be able to utilize federal relief programs to get help for farm-related losses incurred since April 30 as a result of severe storms, flooding, mudslides, straight line winds and tornadoes.

    “Kentucky farmers have lost thousands of acres of crops, and some had farm equipment and fences damaged,” Commissioner Farmer said. “I want them to know they are not alone. There are several programs available through the Farm Service Agency to assist them in their recovery.”

  • Garden problems showing up due to rain

    The flooding rains after the abnormally dry winter and early spring haven’t put  much damper (no pun intended) on the spring planting season, as of yet anyway.  Based on the calls I am getting the vegetable gardens are growing full swing, the fruit plants are blooming heavily or have already set fruit, the asparagus is in need of cutting almost daily, and the flowers are absolutely beautiful!  However, there are problems lurking around every corner and now the high moisture diseases are going to start showing up.

  • May brings good news to cattle markets

    We are going to share with a summary of recent cattle market happenings put together  by Kenny Burdine, UK AG economist.  People are interested, excited and grateful for recent market prices.  Unfortunately, we are so far down in cattle numbers, and we are missing a lot of opportunity here in the county.  Recent years financially had been so unfavorable many people are having to sale the very heifers that they need to keep.  Kenny’s information may help you with some decision making.  

  • May is National Beef Month

    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer invites Kentuckians to join him in celebrating National Beef Month in Kentucky in May.

    “Kentucky is the largest cow-calf state east of the Mississippi River,” Commissioner Farmer said. “Kentucky farmers take in about $600 million a year from the sale of cattle and calves. I want to thank all of our beef producers for their efforts to produce quality products that help Kentucky’s economy, and I encourage all Kentuckians to do the same.”

  • Sign up now for conservation program

    Washington County landowners still have time to sign up for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) at their local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office, but the deadline for getting signed up for the second CSP ranking period is quickly approaching. According to NRCS District Conservationist Herb Davis, now is the time for landowners and producers who have considered applying for CSP to get signed up and submit documentation. USDA has announced the national cutoff date for CSP is June 11, which requires landowners submit applications quickly.

  • Article provides insight on organic food

    Years ago, in talking with know-it-all do-gooders, I learned to answer them with sentiments similar to Dr. Les Anderson.  In a perfect world, if we raise all organic food, the number one question is “who is going to die.”   Here is an article from Dr. Anderson I thought would be of interest to you all.

    Who Decides Who Dies?

  • Talk Meet results announced

    The Washington County 4-H County-wide Talk Meet was held on Monday, May 10 at St.