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Agriculture

  • Blight, mites, and spots, oh my!

    Summer has begun according to the weather, but not the calendar.  Personally, I love the heat and humidity, but I know many of you don’t. But hey, that’s why we have four seasons.  There are several problems in the garden right now and if you read my article last week you know the big one is on tomatoes.

  • Follow these ATV safety tips

    School is finally out for summer, and that means kids everywhere are free to spend their time playing outside.  For some, that may mean taking a ride on an ATV.  While we want to encourage children to be active during the summer, we want to make sure that they stay safe.

  • Control late blight on your tomatoes

    A couple of weeks ago we got word that late blight had been found in Kentucky on tomatoes in Northern Kentucky. Last week it showed up in Washington and surrounding counties.  It is unusual for this disease to show up so early in Kentucky.  We generally don’t have a problem with late blight until September or October, which isn’t much of a problem, however last year and now this year it has reared its ugly head early because of transplants sent to Kentucky from northern areas and in this year’s case, Michigan.

  • Sign up for 4-H camp; results announced

    When many people think back to summers growing up, a traditional memory is often of attending summer camp.  Many in Washington County will remember Bingham 4-H Camp that was located at the old Tathum Springs Hotel that burned down several years.  This was the first 4-H Camp owned by Kentucky 4-H.  Now, Kentucky 4-H has four camps and Washington County 4-H members camp at Lake Cumberland 4-H Camp that replaced Bingham 4-H Camp.  

  • Regulator to increase pasture growth

    Some of you may have recently heard about a new plant growth regulator called RyzUp SmartGrass. It is being marketed to increase grass pasture production during late fall and early spring. The product is a formulation of gibberellic acid (often called GA). GA is a naturally occurring plant growth regulator that causes cell elongation in all plants and therefore is essential for plant growth.

  • Problems beginning to show in tobacco float beds

     A number of problems have begun to crop up in float beds around Kentucky, some related to the heat wave that took place back in April and others to the heavy rains that fell recently. Over the past week, we have seen a huge spike in reports of target spot along with a few cases of Pythium root rot. At the moment, the ‘strongest’ fungicide we can recommend for target spot is mancozeb (Dithane, Manzate, or Penncozeb).

  • Master Gardeners plant at arboretum

    I thought gardeners would be interested in reading this article written by Carol Spence.

    Within the space of a couple of hours on a day in mid-May, hints of Kentucky and splashes of whimsy materialized across The Arboretum, the State Botanical Garden of Kentucky. Flowers sprang up so quickly throughout the garden that one might suspect it was the work of garden fairies.

  • Farmers need to utilize flood relief programs

    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer advises that Kentucky farmers may be able to utilize federal relief programs to get help for farm-related losses incurred since April 30 as a result of severe storms, flooding, mudslides, straight line winds and tornadoes.

    “Kentucky farmers have lost thousands of acres of crops, and some had farm equipment and fences damaged,” Commissioner Farmer said. “I want them to know they are not alone. There are several programs available through the Farm Service Agency to assist them in their recovery.”

  • Garden problems showing up due to rain

    The flooding rains after the abnormally dry winter and early spring haven’t put  much damper (no pun intended) on the spring planting season, as of yet anyway.  Based on the calls I am getting the vegetable gardens are growing full swing, the fruit plants are blooming heavily or have already set fruit, the asparagus is in need of cutting almost daily, and the flowers are absolutely beautiful!  However, there are problems lurking around every corner and now the high moisture diseases are going to start showing up.

  • May brings good news to cattle markets

    We are going to share with a summary of recent cattle market happenings put together  by Kenny Burdine, UK AG economist.  People are interested, excited and grateful for recent market prices.  Unfortunately, we are so far down in cattle numbers, and we are missing a lot of opportunity here in the county.  Recent years financially had been so unfavorable many people are having to sale the very heifers that they need to keep.  Kenny’s information may help you with some decision making.