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Agriculture

  • May is National Beef Month

    Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer invites Kentuckians to join him in celebrating National Beef Month in Kentucky in May.

    “Kentucky is the largest cow-calf state east of the Mississippi River,” Commissioner Farmer said. “Kentucky farmers take in about $600 million a year from the sale of cattle and calves. I want to thank all of our beef producers for their efforts to produce quality products that help Kentucky’s economy, and I encourage all Kentuckians to do the same.”

  • Sign up now for conservation program

    Washington County landowners still have time to sign up for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) at their local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office, but the deadline for getting signed up for the second CSP ranking period is quickly approaching. According to NRCS District Conservationist Herb Davis, now is the time for landowners and producers who have considered applying for CSP to get signed up and submit documentation. USDA has announced the national cutoff date for CSP is June 11, which requires landowners submit applications quickly.

  • Article provides insight on organic food

    Years ago, in talking with know-it-all do-gooders, I learned to answer them with sentiments similar to Dr. Les Anderson.  In a perfect world, if we raise all organic food, the number one question is “who is going to die.”   Here is an article from Dr. Anderson I thought would be of interest to you all.

    Who Decides Who Dies?

  • Talk Meet results announced

    The Washington County 4-H County-wide Talk Meet was held on Monday, May 10 at St.

  • Report flood losses to FSA

    The Farm Service Agency reminds livestock producers who suffered livestock losses due to the May 1 floods that they must report losses to the FSA office to be eligible for the Livestock Indemnity Program. (LIP)

    LIP provides assistance to producers for livestock deaths that result from disaster. LIP compensates livestock owners and contract growers for livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather, including losses due to hurricanes, floods, blizzards, disease, wildfires, extreme heat and extreme cold.

  • Watch moisture levels in hay

    Last year was a challenging year for even our experienced hay producers relative to baling and storage moisture. We experienced several hay fires, along with lower quality as a result of excessive heating caused by baling at higher than safe moisture. When the internal temperature of hay rises above 130 degrees Fahrenheit, problems arise that will initially lead to lower quality and possibly spontaneous combustion. All hay baled above 15 percent moisture and above will show some increase in temperature for the first couple weeks after baling.

  • USDA to assess flood losses

    John W. McCauley, FSA state executive Director for Kentucky, has announced that USDA state and county emergency boards are in the process of completing detailed loss assessment reports for losses resulting from the April 30 and continued flooding. “The State Emergency Board will provide internal assessment reports to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack as soon as practical,” said McCauley. “Because the flooding continues, full assessments cannot be completed at this time.”

  • 4-H fashion revue held

    “Going Pink”  was the theme of the Washington/Marion County 4-H Fashion Revue held on April 27 at the Washington County Extension Office.  Nine 4-H members from each county participated in the show that highlighted the sewing projects they completed this year.  Each 4-Her is now qualified to participate in the Lincoln Trail 4-H Rally Day scheduled for Saturday, May 15 at the Elizabethtown Christian Academy.  Participating from Washington County were Danielle Wilkerson, Amanda DeWitt , Makayla Lanham  ,Abbigail Gullett ,  Jenny Begley,&nbsp

  • Growing tasty tomatoes in your garden

    Before I write about tomato growing, I want to remind everyone that the Tuesday, May 11, Wheelbarrow Class on growing great annuals from seed still has a few openings for anyone that would like to attend.  Call the Washington County Extension Office at 859-336-7741.  If you haven’t attended any classes, the cost is $10, if you have already attended some classes the cost is $5.   Each person attending will receive at least 15 packages of flower seeds.

  • 4-H Youth Fair results announced

    The annual 4-H Youth Fair was held on April 23 and 24 at the extension office.  The overall class champions in each class are now qualified for the Kentucky State Fair in August.  Other projects such as horticulture, food preservation, crops and all natural sciences will qualify in late summer for the Kentucky State Fair.  Summer classes dealing with science, technology and agriculture will be announced soon and will be open to all youth of 4-H age in Washington County.