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Agriculture

  • Blue mold risk low for Kentucky

    Continued hot and dry weather should help keep blue mold out of Kentucky. Forecasters at North Carolina State University project a low risk to our area from the currently known sources of disease in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. Even though the threat of blue mold is low now, keeping an eye out is never a bad idea when it comes to this disease. Historically, the first cases of blue mold have been reported in late June through mid-July, and our status could change should cool and wet conditions occur later on.

  • Meat prices reflect supply and demand

    Consumers may be in the driver’s seat when it comes to higher meat prices. Indications are that retail meat prices may rise to record highs later this year, according to a University of Kentucky agricultural economist, and it all rests on that bedrock of free market economics — supply and demand.

  • Forage producers need to watch for poison hemlock in hayfields

    Many farmers across the state have just made or will soon make their first hay of the season. While making hay, it is important for growers to notice and remove any poison hemlock from their hay or pasture fields.

    Native to Europe, poison hemlock is an invasive weed that was introduced as an ornamental in the United States during the 1800s. It is potentially poisonous if ingested by livestock or humans in both its vegetative growth stages and when dry.

  • Are you eligible for SURE program?

    John W. McCauley, executive director of USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) in Kentucky, encourages producers who suffered crop production losses during the 2008 crop year to contact their local FSA office before a deadline is announced to see if they are eligible to participate in the Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments Program (SURE). This program provides financial assistance to producers who have suffered crop losses due to natural disasters.

  • Overabundance of clover raises concern

    As extension forage specialists we have been asked to comment on factors that have contributed to the abundance of clover in 2010.

    We have been in regular contact with livestock producers and industry throughout the state, and we have heard about and seen an overabundance of white clover in many pastures this year.

    This has raised concerns about bloat, and a number of farmers have experienced death losses due to bloat. There are several reasons for the high percentage of white clover this year.

  • Recent heat createts problems

    I am in the process of determining whether or not a Master Gardener Program is needed this year.  This means I need to find out how many of you are interested.  This will be a day class, meaning we will either meet from 9 a.m. until noon or 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. The days of the week will be determined based on interest.  So, if you are interested call me or email me at the Washington County Extension Office at 859-336-7741 or dennis.morgeson@uky.edu.

    I will send you an information packet to help you determine if it is something you would like to participate in.

  • 4-H'ers attend leadership conference

    Kentucky 4-H Teen Conference is the annual leadership conference for high school 4-H members.  This year’s conference took place June 14–17 on the University of Kentucky campus.

  • Scout tobacco fields

    Blue mold is still being reported in North Carolina, but is not thought to be active elsewhere in the United States. For Kentucky, the threat from blue mold is low at this time. The weather has been unfavorable for disease development, and should remain this way during the week of June 21. Still, growers should scout fields regularly and be prepared to act if the disease is found.

  • Family living expenses continue to rise

    Farm business analysis specialists saw an increase in both net farm income and family living expenses during 2009.  This is according to data collected on 103 farms enrolled in the Kentucky Farm Business Management Program that provide family living information.

  • 4-H members win awards at event in Lexington

    Summer is here and several of our projects clubs are in full swing!  The 4-H Sharpshooters have been busy participating in various tournaments and doing very well.  They will be participating in the District 4 Shoot in Mercer County this weekend and I’m sure they will make Washington County proud!  The 4-H Young Riders have been busy with their summer events as well.  The State Horse Events were held in Lexington on June 10 – 11 and as always the club received many awards.  Congratulations to these two clubs for their successes so far.  Below you wi