.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • 4-H'ers attend leadership conference

    Kentucky 4-H Teen Conference is the annual leadership conference for high school 4-H members.  This year’s conference took place June 14–17 on the University of Kentucky campus.

  • Scout tobacco fields

    Blue mold is still being reported in North Carolina, but is not thought to be active elsewhere in the United States. For Kentucky, the threat from blue mold is low at this time. The weather has been unfavorable for disease development, and should remain this way during the week of June 21. Still, growers should scout fields regularly and be prepared to act if the disease is found.

  • Family living expenses continue to rise

    Farm business analysis specialists saw an increase in both net farm income and family living expenses during 2009.  This is according to data collected on 103 farms enrolled in the Kentucky Farm Business Management Program that provide family living information.

  • 4-H members win awards at event in Lexington

    Summer is here and several of our projects clubs are in full swing!  The 4-H Sharpshooters have been busy participating in various tournaments and doing very well.  They will be participating in the District 4 Shoot in Mercer County this weekend and I’m sure they will make Washington County proud!  The 4-H Young Riders have been busy with their summer events as well.  The State Horse Events were held in Lexington on June 10 – 11 and as always the club received many awards.  Congratulations to these two clubs for their successes so far.  Below you wi

  • How to control mosquitoes

    I don’t know how many of you have mosquito problems, but at my house you can’t go outside for more than  a few minutes at a time before getting attacked by the little blood suckers.  With the rain we have had of late, and some of you have had a lot more than others, there are bound to be many of you out there suffering as I am.  I remember the good old days when mosquitoes only came out to bite at dusk?   The imported tiger mosquito likes to bite any time of day and the hotter the better.  Guess where the tiger mosquito was imported from, you guesse

  • 4-H Sharpshooters compete

    The Washington County 4-H Sharpshooters trap and archery teams kicked off their summer competitions on May 15 with the Spencer County Invitational competition.  They followed that competition with the Washington/Marion County Invitational competition on June 5.  Results from both competitions are listed below.  The pistol and rifle teams will begin their summer competitive events on June 26 at the District 4 Invitational that will be held at the Mercer County Gun Club.  Watch the Springfield Sun for results from the various competitions for shooting sports and other 4-H

  • Legumes send a second-round blow

    The following is an article from Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler, beef extension specialist,  University of Kentucky, and I thought it would be of some interest to you all.

  • Blight, mites, and spots, oh my!

    Summer has begun according to the weather, but not the calendar.  Personally, I love the heat and humidity, but I know many of you don’t. But hey, that’s why we have four seasons.  There are several problems in the garden right now and if you read my article last week you know the big one is on tomatoes.

  • Follow these ATV safety tips

    School is finally out for summer, and that means kids everywhere are free to spend their time playing outside.  For some, that may mean taking a ride on an ATV.  While we want to encourage children to be active during the summer, we want to make sure that they stay safe.

  • Control late blight on your tomatoes

    A couple of weeks ago we got word that late blight had been found in Kentucky on tomatoes in Northern Kentucky. Last week it showed up in Washington and surrounding counties.  It is unusual for this disease to show up so early in Kentucky.  We generally don’t have a problem with late blight until September or October, which isn’t much of a problem, however last year and now this year it has reared its ugly head early because of transplants sent to Kentucky from northern areas and in this year’s case, Michigan.