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Agriculture

  • Talk Meet results announced

    The Washington County 4-H County-wide Talk Meet was held on Monday, May 10 at St.

  • Report flood losses to FSA

    The Farm Service Agency reminds livestock producers who suffered livestock losses due to the May 1 floods that they must report losses to the FSA office to be eligible for the Livestock Indemnity Program. (LIP)

    LIP provides assistance to producers for livestock deaths that result from disaster. LIP compensates livestock owners and contract growers for livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality due to adverse weather, including losses due to hurricanes, floods, blizzards, disease, wildfires, extreme heat and extreme cold.

  • Watch moisture levels in hay

    Last year was a challenging year for even our experienced hay producers relative to baling and storage moisture. We experienced several hay fires, along with lower quality as a result of excessive heating caused by baling at higher than safe moisture. When the internal temperature of hay rises above 130 degrees Fahrenheit, problems arise that will initially lead to lower quality and possibly spontaneous combustion. All hay baled above 15 percent moisture and above will show some increase in temperature for the first couple weeks after baling.

  • USDA to assess flood losses

    John W. McCauley, FSA state executive Director for Kentucky, has announced that USDA state and county emergency boards are in the process of completing detailed loss assessment reports for losses resulting from the April 30 and continued flooding. “The State Emergency Board will provide internal assessment reports to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack as soon as practical,” said McCauley. “Because the flooding continues, full assessments cannot be completed at this time.”

  • 4-H fashion revue held

    “Going Pink”  was the theme of the Washington/Marion County 4-H Fashion Revue held on April 27 at the Washington County Extension Office.  Nine 4-H members from each county participated in the show that highlighted the sewing projects they completed this year.  Each 4-Her is now qualified to participate in the Lincoln Trail 4-H Rally Day scheduled for Saturday, May 15 at the Elizabethtown Christian Academy.  Participating from Washington County were Danielle Wilkerson, Amanda DeWitt , Makayla Lanham  ,Abbigail Gullett ,  Jenny Begley,&nbsp

  • Growing tasty tomatoes in your garden

    Before I write about tomato growing, I want to remind everyone that the Tuesday, May 11, Wheelbarrow Class on growing great annuals from seed still has a few openings for anyone that would like to attend.  Call the Washington County Extension Office at 859-336-7741.  If you haven’t attended any classes, the cost is $10, if you have already attended some classes the cost is $5.   Each person attending will receive at least 15 packages of flower seeds.

  • 4-H Youth Fair results announced

    The annual 4-H Youth Fair was held on April 23 and 24 at the extension office.  The overall class champions in each class are now qualified for the Kentucky State Fair in August.  Other projects such as horticulture, food preservation, crops and all natural sciences will qualify in late summer for the Kentucky State Fair.  Summer classes dealing with science, technology and agriculture will be announced soon and will be open to all youth of 4-H age in Washington County.

  • Cows not to blame for climate change

    This is an interesting article we received this week, and I would like to share with you.

    Despite oft-repeated claims by sources ranging from the United Nations to music star Paul McCartney, it is simply not true that consuming less meat and dairy products will help stop climate change.  

    UC Davis associate professor and air quality specialist Frank Mitolehner says that McCartney and the chair of the U.N.’s Intergovernmental   Panel on Climate Change ignored science when they launched a European campaign called “Less Meat = Less Heat.”

  • Specialty crop grants to be awarded

    Funding is available for projects that enhance the competitiveness of Kentucky’s specialty crop industries, Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer has announced.

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for up to $75,000 for specialty crop projects. Grants will be awarded through a competitive process.

    Specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruit, horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture.

  • Emerald Ash Borer traps being installed

    Those who live or travel in Kentucky this summer probably will see purple prisms hanging at least 10 feet above the ground in ash trees. These prisms are traps for the Emerald Ash Borer, a destructive insect that was found in Kentucky during the summer of 2009.