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Agriculture

  • 4-H talent show winners announced

    The annual 4-H Talent Show was held on Friday, April 16, at the Springfield Opera House.   Each act was outstanding and the top acts from Friday night will now advance to the district event scheduled for Saturday, May 15, in Elizabethtown.  In the senior vocal category, winning champion was Rose Clements who performed “Sandra Dee.”  Winning reserve champion was Mary Kutter singing “Valentine.” Receiving blue ribbons were Bob Grider who sang “Close Every Door” and Brittany Wells and Tyler Adams who sang “Sissy’s Song.”

  • Springtime decisions impact dairy profit for the next year

    Kentucky’s spring weather sometimes makes harvesting quality forages a challenge. Spring rains can delay harvest, and since most producers rely on forages for their dairy cows’ nutritional needs, the key is to make the most of Kentucky’s unpredictable weather.

  • Weigh Down winners announced

    “Weigh Down Washington County 2010” began on Jan. 5 and had its last regular meeting on March 2.  Once again, this winter was a challenge with a lot of cold, snowy weather, especially on meeting days.  Many members missed class due to bad roads and miserable weather conditions.  Missing class is not good when you are at home hungry and can’t get away from tempting food.

  • Shop smart at your farmers market

    Farmers markets are flourishing.  According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 5,000 exist today.  Chances are, one is located in your neck of the woods.

    Many of Kentucky’s popular “homegrown” offerings become available this month as markets around the state open for the 2010 season.  An hour perusing the stalls at your local market is a fun way to spend a morning, and the bonus is flavorful food straight from the garden to the table.

    Here are a few tips to help you get the most from your trip to the market.

  • Growers defend their work providing grain for livestock, ethanol

    As corn growers nationwide, and in Kentucky, are lining up beside livestock producers to defend livestock on many fronts, the American Meat Institute (AMI) is lining up beside anti-agriculture activist groups to fight against corn and ethanol.  AMI’s members include the major meat processors, with several in Kentucky.

  • Managing deer issues in fields

    Every year deer cause $10,000 or more worth of damage to crops and yards.  You may find this information from Dr. Tom Barnes, UK College of AG Wildlife specialist, helpful.  

  • Introduced plants can have negative impact

    Most of us have heard the phrase “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.”  You can apply this adage to your landscape just as easily as you can apply it to your attic.  It may surprise you to learn some flowers and landscape plants you find attractive are actually weeds that can have a negative economic impact on the environment.

  • 4-Hers prepare for talent show; results announced

    This spring, 4-H members are busy getting ready for the numerous activities and events.  Sometimes it’s hard to know what ones to include first in the 4-H news!  Today will start the inclusion of results from the 4-H Talk Meet program.  The first school event was held on Tuesday, March 23 at St. Dominic Elementary.  The list of results will be included after the announcement of other upcoming 4-H events.  Congratulations to all of the participants for an outstanding job.

  • 4-H members visit Frankfort

    Approximately 1,000 4-H members from across the state converged on Frankfort for 4-H Capitol Experience day last week.  The day gave 4-H members a chance to not only tour the Capitol but also to visit with their legislators and to see state government in action.

  • Plant cool season plants now

    Spring has started and it seems to have started all at once - the birds are chirping and the sting of cold has been replaced by mild, fresh air.  I don’t know why, but spring just smells better, sounds better, and feels better this year!  It must be because winter felt like it lasted ten years.  We are still going to have some cold weather, frosts, and freezes but there are a lot of plants that can and should be planted now in the vegetable and flower garden.