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Agriculture

  • Discussing clover role, hay and horses

    CLOVERS IN KENTUCKY

    During the forage program at the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Annual Convention, Don Sorrell, KFGC, President had the opportunity to talk about the “role of clover” down on the farm. To address this subject he surveyed Kentucky’s agriculture agents. The following is a summary of the results of that survey.

    • 34 percent of Kentucky’s farmers seed clover as a hay crop and 42 percent seed clover in their pasture fields.

  • Sign up for 4-H conference; enter essay contest

    The Kentucky 4-H Summit is the only event 4-H puts on that is just for middle school youth.  It is a fun-filled three-day conference held at the Kentucky Leadership Center in Jabez, Ky.

  • Kentucky Proud produces jobs, economic activity

    A lot of people ask me, "What is Kentucky Proud?" What is its purpose? What does it mean that a product is “Kentucky Proud?” What has Kentucky Proud done for Kentucky agriculture and Kentucky’s economy?"

  • Relax and enjoy your sewing!

    This week we begin a new monthly sewing article which will include some fun facts about sewing related ideas that often come our way.

    Firstly, let us introduce ourselves. We are a couple of youngish middle-aged birds who have been certified from the University of Kentucky for over four years in sewing construction. That’s  actually eight years of intensive training between the two of us, and we have some great techniques to pass on. Our names are THIS and THAT. Confused already?

  • Beekeeping workshops to be offered

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky State University are teaming up to offer beekeeping schools throughout the state.

    Whether you are a veteran beekeeper or a beginner eager to get started, these day-long educational workshops, held on Saturdays, offer sessions on everything from where to buy equipment to tips on harvesting your first batch of honey.

  • KFBM completes Beef Enterprise Analysis

    The Kentucky Farm Business Management Program (KFBM) recently completed the 2008 Beef Enterprise Analysis.  This study focused on two beef cattle enterprises, those in which calves are sold at weaning (calves sold) and those in which calves are retained for at least 45 days after weaning (calves backgrounded).  There were 8 farms in the calves sold group and 10 in the calves backgrounded group.  Although these results can not be extrapolated across all Kentucky beef operations, it is our belief that they accurately portray the beef operations on the KFBM program.

  • Remember winter weather safety for seniors

    Winter weather emergencies can be difficult for many older Kentuckians. Senior citizens should consider safety concerns, including falling, hypothermia and frost bite, before venturing out in bad weather.

     Many seniors have medical conditions that require treatment. They may run low on medicine or have no way to get to their family doctor. In the event of a medical emergency, call 911 first. Some pharmacies may deliver medications, even in bad weather. Call your pharmacist or physician with questions about medications.

  • Young Riders learn horsemanship skills

    The  Washington County 4-H Young Riders Club helps youth learn about the pride of owning a horse or pony and being responsible for its management and learn skills in horsemanship and understanding of the business of  breeding.

    The club meets the third Monday of each month and new members are welcome.  Owning a horse is not a requirement to join the club.  Below is information that will be helpful to horse owners in Washington County.  For more information on the Washington County 4-H Young Riders contact the Extension Office at 336-7741.

  • Switchgrass pelletized for biomass as part of UK research project

    Round switchgrass pellets, resembling small pieces of wood, rolled off machines at Midwestern Biofuels in Wurtland as the crop from a biomass research project at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture was pelletized for the first time.

  • Livestock competitions to begin soon

    Although the warmer temperatures of spring and summer are just wishful thinking, it’s time for 4-H members who want to participate in livestock projects to begin making plans.  Kentucky 4-H requires that each member receive six or more hours of instruction in the various areas of livestock care, judging and general knowledge in order to participate in any 4-H livestock competition.  In Washington County, 4-H members join the 4-H Hooves and Horns Club to learn about the livestock industry and earn their six hours.