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Agriculture

  • Beekeeping workshops to be offered

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky State University are teaming up to offer beekeeping schools throughout the state.

    Whether you are a veteran beekeeper or a beginner eager to get started, these day-long educational workshops, held on Saturdays, offer sessions on everything from where to buy equipment to tips on harvesting your first batch of honey.

  • KFBM completes Beef Enterprise Analysis

    The Kentucky Farm Business Management Program (KFBM) recently completed the 2008 Beef Enterprise Analysis.  This study focused on two beef cattle enterprises, those in which calves are sold at weaning (calves sold) and those in which calves are retained for at least 45 days after weaning (calves backgrounded).  There were 8 farms in the calves sold group and 10 in the calves backgrounded group.  Although these results can not be extrapolated across all Kentucky beef operations, it is our belief that they accurately portray the beef operations on the KFBM program.

  • Remember winter weather safety for seniors

    Winter weather emergencies can be difficult for many older Kentuckians. Senior citizens should consider safety concerns, including falling, hypothermia and frost bite, before venturing out in bad weather.

     Many seniors have medical conditions that require treatment. They may run low on medicine or have no way to get to their family doctor. In the event of a medical emergency, call 911 first. Some pharmacies may deliver medications, even in bad weather. Call your pharmacist or physician with questions about medications.

  • Young Riders learn horsemanship skills

    The  Washington County 4-H Young Riders Club helps youth learn about the pride of owning a horse or pony and being responsible for its management and learn skills in horsemanship and understanding of the business of  breeding.

    The club meets the third Monday of each month and new members are welcome.  Owning a horse is not a requirement to join the club.  Below is information that will be helpful to horse owners in Washington County.  For more information on the Washington County 4-H Young Riders contact the Extension Office at 336-7741.

  • Switchgrass pelletized for biomass as part of UK research project

    Round switchgrass pellets, resembling small pieces of wood, rolled off machines at Midwestern Biofuels in Wurtland as the crop from a biomass research project at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture was pelletized for the first time.

  • Livestock competitions to begin soon

    Although the warmer temperatures of spring and summer are just wishful thinking, it’s time for 4-H members who want to participate in livestock projects to begin making plans.  Kentucky 4-H requires that each member receive six or more hours of instruction in the various areas of livestock care, judging and general knowledge in order to participate in any 4-H livestock competition.  In Washington County, 4-H members join the 4-H Hooves and Horns Club to learn about the livestock industry and earn their six hours.

  • Attend spring gardening classes

     If you are like me, the seed catalogs are piling up and you probably peek through them quite often dreaming of warmer weather and fresh produce.  While you are planning crop rotation strategies and picking which cultivars to grow you can also plan on attending some new and exciting classes at the Washington County Extension Office.   I have put together the 2010 version of my annual spring gardening series better known as the Wheelbarrow Series.  There should be a class or two that will interest even the most knowledgeable and well rounded gardener.  Some of t

  • Cold weather can cause livestock problems

    The cold weather has finally reached us. These arctic blasts can cause problems for livestock operations ranging from frozen waterers to sick cattle. In these situations, hindsight is often 20/20 due to lack of preparation. I encourage folks to jot down the “little things” in these instances that could be prepared for during the warmer days of fall leading up to winter.

  • Producers receive $4.5 million in disaster payments

    USDA has already made more than $4.5 million in disaster payments to Kentucky’s livestock producers after implementing two new programs in 2009, demonstrating USDA’s commitment to rapidly meeting the goals of Congress and providing farmers and ranchers with timely and effective disaster assistance.

  • Taking a look at tobacco

    We have received some tobacco information from Dr. Will Snell that I think you all would be interested in reading. The following is an article about 2009 Review and the 2010 Projection.

    2009 Review: