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Agriculture

  • Attend spring gardening classes

     If you are like me, the seed catalogs are piling up and you probably peek through them quite often dreaming of warmer weather and fresh produce.  While you are planning crop rotation strategies and picking which cultivars to grow you can also plan on attending some new and exciting classes at the Washington County Extension Office.   I have put together the 2010 version of my annual spring gardening series better known as the Wheelbarrow Series.  There should be a class or two that will interest even the most knowledgeable and well rounded gardener.  Some of t

  • Cold weather can cause livestock problems

    The cold weather has finally reached us. These arctic blasts can cause problems for livestock operations ranging from frozen waterers to sick cattle. In these situations, hindsight is often 20/20 due to lack of preparation. I encourage folks to jot down the “little things” in these instances that could be prepared for during the warmer days of fall leading up to winter.

  • Producers receive $4.5 million in disaster payments

    USDA has already made more than $4.5 million in disaster payments to Kentucky’s livestock producers after implementing two new programs in 2009, demonstrating USDA’s commitment to rapidly meeting the goals of Congress and providing farmers and ranchers with timely and effective disaster assistance.

  • Taking a look at tobacco

    We have received some tobacco information from Dr. Will Snell that I think you all would be interested in reading. The following is an article about 2009 Review and the 2010 Projection.

    2009 Review:

  • HIgher moisture levels increase importance of stored grain management

    Grain was harvested at higher moisture levels this past fall on many farms in Kentucky and neighboring states. With much of that grain now in storage bins, growers need to take extra precautions in managing it.

    “A point or two of moisture makes a lot of difference in the storability of the crop. Higher moisture levels require more care,” said Sam McNeill, extension agricultural engineer with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

  • Leaf collection winners announced for WCES

    Over the past several days, various news media have released lists of top stories from 2009 and from the first decade of the 21st Century. It was certainly interesting to have a review of what took place and certain news items I had already forgotten.  

  • UK Grain Crops Academy expands

    To share the latest research-based information with more grain crops producers across Kentucky, the University of Kentucky Grain Crops Academy will offer programs in two different areas of the state beginning in January.

    The expansion is due to the overwhelming response from producers in each of the previous two years when it was held at only one location.

  • Weigh options when making grain dryer decisions

    During the 2009 harvest, many growers, especially those who relied on natural air drying, struggled to get their grain dried down to appropriate moisture levels. With harvest finished, now is a good time for grain producers to weigh the pros and cons of purchasing a grain dryer.

    “Having a dryer on hand gives you flexibility about when you can harvest and the moisture levels you can work with,” said Sam McNeill, extension agricultural engineer with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

  • Changes to UK soil tests will increase accuracy

    To ensure accurate soil pH readings, the University of Kentucky’s Soil Testing Laboratory has developed a new method for conducting soil tests. This method will be implemented beginning Jan. 1, but those who submit soil samples likely will not notice the change because the results will continue to be in the same format, said Frank Sikora, UK soil testing coordinator.

  • Changes to UK soil tests will increase accuracy

    To ensure accurate soil pH readings, the University of Kentucky’s Soil Testing Laboratory has developed a new method for conducting soil tests. This method will be implemented beginning Jan. 1, but those who submit soil samples likely will not notice the change because the results will continue to be in the same format, said Frank Sikora, UK soil testing coordinator.