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Agriculture

  • Late blight is showing up early

    If you haven’t already started a fungicide program on your tomato plants this year, you may want to start.  Last week I, along with most agriculture agents and horticulture agents in the state, received an e-mail from the Vegetable Plant Disease Pathologist from the University of Kentucky.

  • 4-Hers attend camp, compete in horse show

    Fireworks, fried apple pies, boating, swimming, archery, campfire– all of the words say summer fun!  That’s what Washington County 4-Her’s experienced and more, June 29 – July 2  at Lake Cumberland 4-H Camp.  Thirty-one campers and counselors from Washington County joined with Taylor, LaRue, Meade and Russell counties for a week of camp activities and fun.

  • Aquaculture Field Day set for July 25 in Frankfort

    Aquaculture enthusiasts will have an opportunity to learn more about the enterprise at a July field day in Frankfort.

    Kentucky State University and the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service are offering a free Aquaculture Field Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT July 25 at KSU’s Aquaculture Research Center. Participants will have a chance to learn more about research regarding largemouth bass, koi, freshwater prawn, crayfish and paddlefish.

  • Emerald ash borer quarantine specifics addressed

    Recently, the Kentucky Office of the State Entomologist, in consultation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, issued a quarantine for 20 counties due to the emerald ash borer. Since the quarantine was issued, questions have arisen about the emerald ash borer, including controlling its spread and effects on ash trees.

  • UK ag meteorologist warns of livestock heat stress

    Recently Kentuckians have experienced some of the highest heat indices of the season. Livestock become uncomfortable when the heat index reaches about 90 degrees. With heat indices at or above that level this week, it’s critical for producers to be aware of what’s going on with the animals.

  • Be careful when spraying herbicides

    I have gotten several calls about plants doing weird things and having weird diseases only to get samples and home visits to determine that the plants were actually suffering from herbicide spray drift.  What gardeners need to realize is that not all herbicides stay where they are sprayed and that some plants are very sensitive to some of these chemicals.  Also, if you spray herbicide and it damages someone else’s plants you are liable.

  • Blue mold risk is fairly low

    Here are the latest tobacco updates from Kenny Seebold, U.K. tobacco specialist and I thought you would like to read about them.

    As of June 22, blue mold has been found in two counties in southeastern Pennsylvania.  Disease has not spread significantly beyond the areas that were reported to have been affected originally.

  • Poison hemlock: A growing concern in Kentucky

    This spring we have had more questions pertaining to Poison Hemlock, so we thought we would share this with you all.

  • Watch for beetles, plant diseases

    The Japanese beetles are back!  The last few years they haven’t been as bad because of natural diseases that have built up over time since they moved in as well as trouble they have had lately in hard droughty soils.

  • 4-H members participate in state horse events

    The Kentucky 4-H State Horse Events were held in Lexington on June 9 and 10.  Each year, hundreds of 4-H horse project members from across the state compete in the two-day event.

    Three Washington Co. 4-H Young Riders members, Brittany Wells, Brandon Wells and Tyler Adams, participated in this year’s event.