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Agriculture

  • SIgn-up date for programs extended to Aug. 14

     Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced that USDA has extended the sign-up deadline from June 1 to Aug. 14, 2009, for both the Direct and Counter-cyclical Program (DCP) and the forthcoming Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) Program. This action extends the sign-up deadline by 10 weeks to give producers ample time to decide whether to participate in ACRE or remain in DCP.

  • Practice green gardening by following tips

    I recently taught a class on gardening greener and thought the information may be useful to those of you that would like to be a little “greener” in the garden and didn’t have the time to attend one of my “Wheelbarrow Series” classes.  So, I have decided to put together my top greener gardening tips.

  • Sclerotinia collar rot reported

    Cool, wet weather has prevailed across much of Kentucky over the past week or so, increasing the risk of diseases on tobacco transplants.  

    The current conditions are particularly favorable for collar rot and target spot.  We have confirmed a case of collar rot from a greenhouse in central Kentucky within the past few days, so the focus of this week’s article will be on recognition and management of this disease.

  • Pythium root rot damages transplants

    Besides blank shank, this is the worst disease we have to deal with.  In the float systems, occasionally this is fatal, but mostly what it does is rob you of time.  With the serious outbreak of this disease it will set the affected plants back four to six weeks.  Most people can’t afford that kind of waiting period.  So, please pay attention to this article and manage accordingly.

  • 4-H members participate in Lincoln Trail Variety Show

    These days we are bombarded with special days and months to honor various causes, and there are so many, it is impossible to keep up with them all.  Although we wonder sometimes why recognition of so many days or months have been created, I have found that it helps to remind me of the importance of those causes perhaps to our community, or to our state or our country.  During April, we celebrate/honor several causes including Earth Day (April 22), Arbor Day (April 24), Kentucky Writers’ Day (April 24) and April as National Poetry Month, Children and Nature Awareness Month an

  • Heifers given for Worthington contest

    Over 160 people from across the state gathered April 4 at the Mercer County Extension Office for the 10th Annual Dustin Worthington “I Love Cows” Essay Contest awards ceremony.  At t his year’s ceremony, eighteen beef heifers were given away to students who participated in the contest.  The contest is open to all FFA & 4-H members interested in the cattle industry in the state of Kentucky. 

  • Talk Meet winners announced

    This week, the remaining results from the 4-H Talk Meet program are listed in the 4-H News including from North Washington Elementary and the County-wide Talk Meet that was held on Thursday, April 9, at St. Catharine College.  

  • Weeding time: Cool, wet weather slows us down

    If you have been trying to garden lately, you know that the cool wet spring so far is slowing us down as well as our plants.  Don’t complain though. Just as easy as the rains are coming now, it could soon stop for a long hot summer, so let’s just enjoy the rain while we have it.  Who knows, we might even get rain for the entire growing season!

  • Ten reasons to make forage first in the rotation

    Provide protein – Legume forages can provide up to 75 percent of the protein needed by lactating dairy cows; corn silage can provide up to 25 percent.

    Provide fiber – Forages are often the only source of fiber in a cow’s diet. Fiber is essential to slow the passage of feed, thereby increasing the amount of nutrients that the cow can absorb from the feed.

    Maximize intake – Forages stimulate cud chewing and rumination, which improve the cow’s appetite.  Some non-forage sources of fiber actually reduce intake.

  • Enter your 4-H projects

    For the past 100 years in Kentucky, project work has been the backbone of 4-H and it’s “learn by doing” motto. 4-H members have entered their completed projects for county and state fairs, many of which they have later worn, used in the home or in early years, used on the farm.