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Agriculture

  • Reduce your pasture expenses

    Reducing pasture expenses can help your bottom line.  But don’t try to starve a profit from pastures or livestock.  Sometimes you need to invest.  This spring, invest in legumes.

    Spring-like weather in February should get you looking forward to next growing season. I’ sure one thing you won’t look forward to, though, is paying for nitrogen fertilizer on your pastures.

  • Tap, bottled water both have benefits

    Water is a vital part of our lives; so it’s no surprise that it is also a big business.  The big debate is whether tap or bottled water is better for you.  The short answer is each has benefits.

    However, sales of bottled water have tripled over the last 10 years. Some believe this is due to marketing ploys; it’s hard to tell if it really is better for you than just plain tap water.  In fact, 25 percent of bottled water is taken directly from the same reservoirs where we get our tap water.

  • AFC approves agriculture loans for projects

    The Kentucky Agricultural Finance Corporation (KAFC), chaired by Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer, approved $356,044 in agricultural loans for projects across the Commonwealth during their Board Meeting on Friday, March 6 in Frankfort.

    At the March meeting applicants from the following counties were approved for the Agricultural Infrastructure Loan Program (AILP), the Beginning Farmer Loan Program (BFLP), or the Large/Food Animal Veterinary Loan Program (LAVLP).

    Adair County (AILP)

    Hancock County (BFLP)

    Logan County (AILP)

  • Producers may request assistance

    Agriculture producers who suffered damage as a result of the January 2009 Ice Storm may request cost-share assistance from USDA to rehabilitate damaged Farmlands. The Emergency Conservation Program (ECP), provides cost-share assistance when disaster damage is so severe that recovery without Federal Assistance is unlikely. Requests for assistance will be accepted at the local FSA Service Center  from Feb. 10 to April 12, 2009.

  • Farmer's market participatants should attend class

    I wanted to let you know about a unique opportunity for those of you that want to or do sell canned or processed foods at farmers markets, roadside stands, or even from your  farm or home. To legally do so you must be microprocessor certified, which means you have to attend a day long class on the subject provided by Dr. Sandra Bastin from the University of Kentucky, however these classes are generally at least  70 to 200 miles from us!  On April 20, 2009 Dr.

  • Register for 4-H camp; Celebration is March 21

    Even though you may not have put away your winter coat for good, the recent spell of warm weather has most of us dreaming about spring and summer.  For many 4-H members, myself included, the thought of summer camp is already on our minds.  Plans for Washington County’s 2009 4-H camping session has already begun and this week, our camping group that consists of Meade, LaRue, Taylor, Russell and Washington Counties will meet for the second camp planning session.  

  • Know dead animal rules on the farm

    This unfortunate but very real part of farming topic comes up far too often, even Frankfort is paying attention now to what should be done in the farming communities.  I thought you would be interested in this recent article from the College of Ag.

    Know the rules for handling animal losses on the farm

  • Plant disease resistant cultivars

    Do you have problems with fire blight, black spot, powdery mildew, Fusarium wilt, early blight, and late blight?  If this is the case, plant disease resistant varieties this year!

  • Census reveals tobacco changes

    We received the following information from Kenny Burdine  and Will Snell at University of  Kentucky and we thought we should share it with you all.  I thought it was very interesting.

    Census Data Reveal Significant and a Few Surprising Changes in Kentucky’s Tobacco Industry:

  • Become a host family; Remember upcoming events

    As Kentucky celebrates 100 years of 4-H, it is interesting to many to learn of how the 4-H program has gone global. 4-H and related programs exist in over 80 countries around the world.  These programs operate independently as there is no international 4-H organization.  However, through international exchanges, global education programs and communications, they share a common bond in 4-H.