.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Agriculture

  • Adult sewing session is March 11

    In Washington County we are very fortunate to have a certified volunteer in the Kentucky Master Clothing Volunteer Program. Our volunteer is Marion Mulligan who received her certification in 2006. Rita Yates from Washington County is in the process of being certified in the program.

  • Be involved in 4-H livestock program

    There are many 4-H projects that young people have enjoyed in the Kentucky 4-H program over the past 100 years.  Some of the most popular over those years have been livestock or animal projects.  These programs not only introduce many youth to animals, but more importantly they help youth learn many life skills through their participation and help them to develop positive character traits to become the leaders of tomorrow.

  • Dorrin and Ruth Ross Scholarship deadline is March 15

    For the 13th year, Washington County college-bound youth who are currently 4-H members or FFA members or were a member their Sr. year in high school (within last 5 years), have the opportunity to apply for the Dorrin and Ruth Ross Scholarship.  The scholarship was originally established in 1991 to enable 4-H and FFA members to pursue higher education through full or part-time attendance at any public or nonprofit independent college or university in the United States.  Scholarships are awarded to defray the cost of tuition and books.

  • Suggestions for replacing ice storm-damaged trees

    I was told by someone (who will remain nameless) that I have told you all what not to do plenty and I need to tell you what to do or plant in this case.  Alright, before I do that I just want to say to everyone out there, stop topping trees!!!!  You are ruining them and making them even more dangerous and likely to fail in the future at an unsuspecting time!

  • 4-H speech contests to be held in March

    Public speaking is one of Americans’ biggest fears. 4-H gives youth a chance to conquer this fear at a young age by giving them public speaking experience through the 4-H speech program. Some of the shyest youth can feel the accomplishment of conquering this fear by giving a speech.

  • Settlement funds spearhead diversification in county

    State agricultural investments have helped many Washington County farmers withstand a decline in tobacco income, county extension agent Rick Greenwell said.

    “If it wasn’t for that,” he said of the state cost share programs, “I have no idea where we would be. It has given us the opportunity to diversify.”

  • If disaster funds become available, document damage now to help

    If you are a farmer or tree fruit producer and you sustained damage to your operation from the late January ice storm, there are some steps you can take that will greatly help if any agricultural disaster funds are made available in the future.

    If your farm has sustained damage to fences, buildings and/or equipment, the first thing you should do is take photographs of the damage. Pictures will help you prove that a loss occurred even if you have to make immediate repairs. Also, document any purchased material and labor that was needed to repair the damaged items.

  • Don't pick trees solely based on ice storm

    As expected, I had several people ask me what was the best tree species to plant in place of the ones being cut down and they want ones that will survive the next ice storm. Well, the answer is, there isn’t one. All tree species sustained damage, however, some worse than others.  For instance, “Bradford” pear was destroyed and it’s a no-brainer to not plant them again, because they also fail in high winds pretty regularly.

     

  • How to prune ice damaged trees

    The ice storm of 2009 will go down as one of the worst, if not the worst on record. With that said, soon if not already, electricity will be restored, water will be restored, clean-up will begin, and we will go about our lives as if nothing happened. However, there is still a nagging long term problem, trees! The scars from this storm are going to be troubling us for years. We will be cutting down and pruning up trees of all sizes and ages. This is only going to cause problems down the road.

  • Keys to a profitable forage program

    REMEMBER YOU ARE A FORAGE FARMER - Forage typically accounts for over half the cost of production of forage – consuming animals and provides most of their nutrition.  Thus, it has a major influence on both expenses and income Forage is the crop and animals are the harvesters or consumers.  Efficient forage production and utilization are essential to a profitable operation.