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Agriculture

  • Control lice in beef cattle: tobacco expo is Jan. 21

    If cattle seem to be scratching excessively against trees, posts, and feeders, to the point of rubbing off large patches of hair or creating raw sores, lice may be the reason.  The species of biting and sucking lice that infest cattle are most numerous and active during the winter and can spread easily through the herd as cattle bunch in response to cold temperatures.  Confirm that lice are the reason for the scratching by examining some animals in the herd.  Part the animal’s hair in spots where lice are likely to occur and look for lice eggs (nits) attached to hairs.&

  • Eligible producers should sign up for MILC program

    The 2008 Farm Bill reauthorized the Milk Income Loss Contact Program (MILC). USDA issues MILC payments on an operation-by-operation basis. Beginning with Fiscal Year 2009 marketings, which started Oct. 1, 2008, the Farm Bill made changes to the provisions for payment eligibility to add an adjusted gross income (AGI) limit. If the individual or entity has annual non-farm AGI for the relevant base period greater than $500,000, the individual or entity is not eligible for MILC benefits.

  • DCP program sign-ups continue until June 1

    Jeffery S. Hall, FSA State Executive Director, reminded farmers that enrollment for the 2009 Direct and Counter-cyclical Payment (DCP) Program for farms with base acres began on Dec. 22 both online and at local FSA Service Centers. Sign-up will continue until June 1, 2009. The June 1 deadline is mandatory for all participants. USDA will not accept any late-filed applications.

  • Celebrate 4-H's centennial throughout 2009

    Kentucky 4-H has impacted the lives of thousands of youths since its inception. As it reaches its 100th anniversary, current and former 4-H’ers will be celebrating the organization’s past, relishing in its present and anxiously anticipating its future. You can help 4-H celebrate this milestone by showing your support for the organization throughout 2009.

  • Fertilizing forage crops in 2009

    Forage producers around the world have struggled over the last year with high fertilizer prices. I’ve had many tell me, “I can’t afford to fertilize my hay or pastures this year. I’ll go broke.” While there is some truth to this statement, in the long term, you will definitely “go broke” if your forage crops don’t have the necessary nutrients for sustained growth. I don’t claim to be a soil science expert, but I would like to provide some basic principles on how to manage the nutrient inputs and outputs on your farm.

  • Cattlemen convention is Jan. 8-10

    The 2009 KCA Convention will be held Jan. 8-10, 2009 in Lexington. The program, “Working Together. Growing Together,” will provide KCA members the opportunity to learn and meet other producers from across the state.

    “The Convention allows all producers to visit the trade show with over 70 booths, get the latest Economic Outlook, and mingle with other producers, all in one place,” said Don Pemberton, KCA Convention Chairman.

  • Reduce your fertilizer rates while maintaining yields

    The prices of fertilizer inputs have increased at an astounding rate the last two years. With the decrease in commodity prices, fertilizer inputs cost may now be the dominate factor in determining a profit. Efficient and wise use of fertilizers and the nutrients in the soil become important in determining the crop grown as well as its profit.

    Below are listed points one should consider to make the fertilizer purchased and the nutrients in the soil profitable for you.

  • KDA launches high-tech system

    Two new Internet-based systems are enabling the Kentucky Department of Agriculture to carry out its pesticide regulation and environmental enforcement duties more efficiently, improving customer service and staff productivity.

  • Alltech receives grant for biorefinery

    Corn is not the only way to make ethanol. Scientists can also make the alternative fuel from the fiber of straw, wood and even corn cobs, scientists told state lawmakers, through a process called cellulosic—or fiber cell wall—technology.

  • 4-H Hooves and Horns meet, watch movie

    The 4-H Hooves and Horns Livestock Club met on Friday, Dec. 5 to enjoy a “moovie” night by watching the movie “Barnyard.” There were 16 members and guests present.

    The next meeting will be Jan. 29, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. at the extension office.

    Anyone interested in joining the club is welcome to attend.