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Agriculture

  • Input prices begin to decline

    In recent weeks, nitrogen prices have taken a downturn, but what the future holds for input costs remains uncertain, said Lloyd Murdock, soils specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    “Typically, when prices start to go down, they begin to drop in one area first, and then the others follow. So it’s going to be a significantly different situation for producers in the coming months,” he said.

  • Nominate a special volunteer for 4-H Hall of Fame

    Do you know of anyone that has made a major impact in your life due to being involved in 4-H? Perhaps you had a 4-H leader that taught you a special skill or got you involved in your community.

    If so, you have the opportunity to nominate these fine members of our community for the State-wide 4-H Hall of Fame!

  • No need to panic about Curly Calf Syndrome

    The recent discovery of Curly Calf Syndrome in the Angus cattle breed has some producers feeling uncertain about the future of the breed, but University of Kentucky Extension Beef Specialist Darrh Bullock says there’s no reason for Kentucky’s beef producers to panic. He believes the best course of action is to stay informed.

    Curly Calf Syndrome is a genetic defect, which researchers believe is caused by a simple recessive gene. It can cause calves to be stillborn with twisted spines. Early research information traces the syndrome back to a popular Angus bull.

  • Enroll farms in DCP by Nov. 26

    New federal legislation now allows farmers and landowners of farms with 10 or fewer base acres the opportunity to receive payments for the 2008 Direct and Counter-Cyclical Payment Program (DCP). On Oct. 13, 2008, President George W. Bush signed a bill that made amendments to the 2008 Farm Bill.

    Originally, the 2008 Farm Bill prohibited DCP payments on farms with 10 acres of base or less, unless the farm is wholly owned by a socially disadvantaged farmer or limited resource farmers. The 2008 enrollment period for the DCP on farms with greater than 10 base acres ended Sept. 30.

  • 4-H'ers to take trips; register for workshop

    One of the mainstays of 4-H over the past 100 years is the teaching of life skills through project work. Each year 4-H members have the opportunity to complete a project which can range from a woodworking, electric, foods and sewing to various livestock projects and shooting sports. Washington County members who completed a project this year have the opportunity to go on the annual awards trip which this year will be on Saturday, Nov. 22 to Louisville Glassworks and the Spaghetti Factory. Registration is due by Thursday, Nov. 20, noon and the cost is $6 plus lunch.

  • SURE provides benefits for farm revenue losses

    Supplemental Revenue Assistant Payments (SURE) provides benefits for farm revenue losses due to natural disaster. It is the 2008 Farm Bill’s successor to the prior Ad Hoc Crop Disaster Programs, also known as the CDP or Crop Disaster Programs. Unlike the prior USDA Programs, SURE is legislated through 2011.

    SURE payments are available to producers on farms that:

    • are located in a county covered by a qualifying natural disaster declaration (USDA Secretarial Declarations only) or a contiguous county or

  • Project empowers farm women
  • Help Kentucky's hungry this holiday season

    There are so many things happening around the holidays that we often times get carried away and overwhelmed with our own world and forget about those in need. Unfortunately, some families and individuals in Kentucky do not know where their next meal is coming from, much less Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner. Since the holidays are a time of giving, those of us that can, should take time from our busy lives to share our blessings with Kentuckians in need this holiday season.

  • Now is the time to winterize strawberry plants

    Perhaps the last garden chore of the season is tucking in the strawberry planting for winter. Strawberry plants have already set their buds for next spring’s flowers and the crop can be lost unless you protect them from harsh winter conditions. A fully dormant strawberry plant’s flower buds can be damaged at temperatures below 15 deg. F.

    In addition to flower bud damage, the alternate freezing and thawing of the soil that commonly occurs in winter and early spring can cause plant roots to break and the plants to be heaved right out of the ground.

  • 4-H Clubs meet; Quilting workshop to be held

    Two 4-H Project Clubs have been busy recognizing their members for outstanding achievements for the 2008 project year.

    Last week, the picture of the 4-H Sharpshooters ran in The Springfield Sun and this week, the 4-H Young Riders picture will be included.