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Agriculture

  • Local youths win big at ARBA convention

    The American Rabbit Breeders Association held its annual convention in Louisville from Oct. 26 – 30. This year’s convention had approximately 24,000 rabbits shown from all over the United States, Japan, and Canada.

    Emily Cermola showed two of her Jersey Wooly rabbits. There were a total of 374 Jersey Wooly rabbits entered with 61 exhibitors. Emily placed third with her self-junior doe Southland’s Pink and seventh with her broken-senior doe Southland’s Rachel

  • National Farm Safety and Health Week is Sept. 21-27

    Kentucky Farm Bureau and the National Safety Council are joining forces to recognize the importance of safe farming practices in conjunction with National Farm Safety and Health Week.

    That observance, now in its 65th year, is set for September 21-27 nationwide, under the theme “Farm Safety---Protect YOUr Investment.”

    The theme, according to Kentucky Farm Bureau President Marshall Coyle, underscores the value of safety and wellness of farmers and farming families.

  • Spurs and Furs results announced

    Here are the results of the Washington County Spurs and furs 4-H Fair show held at the National Guard Armory recently.

    Open Rabbit Show

    French Angora

    Jr. Buck, 1st – Lisa Zesiger; 2nd – Lisa Zesiger

    Jr. Buck, 1st – Lisa Zesiger

    Sr. Buck, 1st – Lisa Zesiger

    Sr. Doe, 1st – Lisa Zesiger; 2nd – Lisa Zesiger

    Best of Breed – Lisa Zesiger – Sr. Doe

    Best Opposite Sex – Lisa Zesiger – Sr. Buck

    American Chincilla

  • Consider grain storage in volatile market

    The price of corn has plummeted since it peaked this summer at around $7 a bushel. The price decline is due to the anticipation of the second largest corn crop in history, lower energy prices and the financial markets, said Cory Walters, UK agricultural economist.

    With harvest coming to a close, producers are trying to determine whether it would be beneficial to them to store their crop until prices rebound, but no one is sure when and if that will happen. On Oct. 27, December corn futures were selling at around $3.80, and March futures were near $4.

  • Lawns need continued care during fall

    Taking care of your lawn during the fall is as important as it is during spring and summer, even more so for lawns with cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue. Nearly all fertilizers and broadleaf herbicides should be applied in the fall, and it is by far the best time to fertilize. Here are some tips for cool-season grasses:

  • Fair Junior Poultry Show results announced

    Washington County Fair Junior Poultry Show results are as follows:

    Large Fowl Cock, 1st – 4th place – Stephen Carney, 5th place – Taylor Graves

    Large Fowl Hen, 1st – 4th place – Stephen Carney, 5th place – Allison Novack

    Large Fowl cockerel, 1st place – Stephen Carney, 2nd place – Robbie Gadd, 3rd place – Stephen Carney, 4th place – Haley Huddleston

  • 4-H to sponsor Kids Back Pack program again

    It is a known fact that children who suffer from food insecurity do not perform well academically, display unacceptable behavior and have poor attendance due to illness or unexcused reasons.

  • 4-H Young Riders Fun Fair Show results announced

    The Washington County Young Riders 4-H Fun Fair Show was held at the Willisbur Community Park on Oct. 5. Here are the results:

    Class 1 - Ride-A-Buck, entries - 9

    First - Brandon Wells

    Second - Abby Murphy

    Third - Gail Cook

    Fourth - Brittany Knight

    Fifth - Isaac Milburn

    Sixth - Mac Strickland

    Class 2 - Egg & Spoon, entries - 19

    First - Abby Murphy

    Second - Megan Stine

    Third - Brittany Knight

    Fourth - Lauren Chesser

    Fifth - Samantha Ross

  • Conference is call to action against invasive species

    The Invasive Species Conference, the first statewide conference to focus on the threat to the state from invasive plants, pathogens and insects, will be Dec. 12 and 13 in Lexington.

  • High input costs, low commodity prices push wheat acreage down

    The state’s winter wheat acreage likely will decrease this year because of high input costs and lower commodity prices, said specialists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    While no official estimates are available yet on how many acres will not be planted, UK Extension Grain Crops Specialist Chad Lee said some producers are saving their wheat seed and opting to plant full-season soybeans in the spring.