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Agriculture

  • Lawns need continued care during fall

    Taking care of your lawn during the fall is as important as it is during spring and summer, even more so for lawns with cool-season grasses such as Kentucky bluegrass and tall fescue. Nearly all fertilizers and broadleaf herbicides should be applied in the fall, and it is by far the best time to fertilize. Here are some tips for cool-season grasses:

  • Fair Junior Poultry Show results announced

    Washington County Fair Junior Poultry Show results are as follows:

    Large Fowl Cock, 1st – 4th place – Stephen Carney, 5th place – Taylor Graves

    Large Fowl Hen, 1st – 4th place – Stephen Carney, 5th place – Allison Novack

    Large Fowl cockerel, 1st place – Stephen Carney, 2nd place – Robbie Gadd, 3rd place – Stephen Carney, 4th place – Haley Huddleston

  • 4-H to sponsor Kids Back Pack program again

    It is a known fact that children who suffer from food insecurity do not perform well academically, display unacceptable behavior and have poor attendance due to illness or unexcused reasons.

  • 4-H Young Riders Fun Fair Show results announced

    The Washington County Young Riders 4-H Fun Fair Show was held at the Willisbur Community Park on Oct. 5. Here are the results:

    Class 1 - Ride-A-Buck, entries - 9

    First - Brandon Wells

    Second - Abby Murphy

    Third - Gail Cook

    Fourth - Brittany Knight

    Fifth - Isaac Milburn

    Sixth - Mac Strickland

    Class 2 - Egg & Spoon, entries - 19

    First - Abby Murphy

    Second - Megan Stine

    Third - Brittany Knight

    Fourth - Lauren Chesser

    Fifth - Samantha Ross

  • Conference is call to action against invasive species

    The Invasive Species Conference, the first statewide conference to focus on the threat to the state from invasive plants, pathogens and insects, will be Dec. 12 and 13 in Lexington.

  • High input costs, low commodity prices push wheat acreage down

    The state’s winter wheat acreage likely will decrease this year because of high input costs and lower commodity prices, said specialists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    While no official estimates are available yet on how many acres will not be planted, UK Extension Grain Crops Specialist Chad Lee said some producers are saving their wheat seed and opting to plant full-season soybeans in the spring.

  • Weed control options to consider

    Dry weather conditions this summer, following another dry season last year, have resulted in grazed pastures with areas that have thin vegetative cover and bare soil. Much of these areas already has evidence of weedy vegetation, such as common ragweed and other summer annuals. As these plants die back naturally, cool-season weeds such as common chickweed, henbit and purple deadnettle will fill in the voids. Other weeds such as buttercup and musk thistle will likely be more prevalent in the coming spring.

  • Grazing conference to address rising costs

    Livestock producers have been some of the hardest hit by skyrocketing fuel, input and feed prices. To help producers get through this economic crunch, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture specialists and industry professionals will offer cost-saving information on pasture management during the ninth Kentucky Grazing Conference.

    The conference is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23 at the Fayette County Extension Office in Lexington.

  • Woodlands management is heartwood of state’s wood industry

    Nearly half of Kentucky’s land is forested. The casual observer might classify those lands as unused acreage, but University of Kentucky foresters know that those “idle” lands are behind the employment of more than 30,000 Kentuckians, double the number employed in the state’s coal industry.

  • Dig up tender bulbs, bring in for winter