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Agriculture

  • Halloween brings back the memories

    Now that Halloween is upon us and fall decorating is in full swing it makes me reminisce about Halloweens past and how times have changed. Yes, I said it, sounding like my parents and grandparents, but times have changed since I was a trick or treater.

    When I was a kid, Halloween and the prospect of getting bags full of candy and trick or treating was something my siblings, cousins and I looked forward to almost as much as Christmas, almost…?

  • Tackle weed problems in your pastures

    Dry weather conditions this summer following another dry season last year have resulted in grazed pastures with areas that have thin vegetative cover and bare soil. Much of these areas already has evidence of weedy vegetation such as common ragweed and other summer annuals. As these plants die back naturally, cool-season weeds such as common chickweed, henbit and purple deadnettle will fill in the voids. Other weeds such as buttercup and musk thistle will likely be more prevalent in the coming spring.

  • Consider limiting hay feeding now

    Some of you are already making decisions about this winter’s feeding. What is worse, some of us are already doing it! One of the things that worked out best last year was turning the cows in to the hay for a short feeding period. Since many of you are counting hay bales now and have either sold cattle or are planning to sell, you may want to consider limited feeding.

  • Clubs gear up for new memberships

    4-H project clubs are gearing up this month to accept new membership. Now is the time for youth who are interested in a project club to join because several have membership deadlines and fall events in which new members should participate.

    The first one coming up this month is the 4-H Spurs and Furs Club. This club is for youth interested in rabbits or poultry. The club will meet on Tuesday, Oct . 21, 6:30 p.m. at the extension office. The club meets monthly and recently sponsored an open rabbit and poultry show during the Crossroads Harvest Festival.

  • Register now for Safe Night

    “Toon In to Safe Night” will be the theme for this year’s Safe Night Washington County program. This is the 10th year for the Washington County Heartland Youth Coalition to sponsor a night where young people can come to have fun in a safe place with no weapons, no arguments, no drugs and alcohol.

    Safe Night Washington County will be held on Saturday, Nov. 15, beginning at 2:30 p.m. at the Washington County Elementary School for fourth and fifth graders. The event will run through 9:30 p.m.

  • Advantages of Bt corn continue to grow

    Over the past 12 years, corn growers have enjoyed lower populations of once troublesome insects and lower yield losses thanks to Bt corn, said Ric Bessin, entomologist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

  • Make your own compost and help the environment

    Have drought, wind, gas prices, economy, politics and the coming of fall got you down? You aren’t alone. So why not start thinking about compost. Yes, that’s right, compost. Why not? It will get your mind off of the many things you can’t do anything about. So, why not do something good for the environment and your garden and start a compost pile. Most people have leaves and dead plants this time of year and probably more so this year due to the drought and wind storm of late.

  • 4-H'ers win ribbons at Kentucky State Fair

    Washington County 4-H members had outstanding representation at this year’s Kentucky State Fair. Besides entering 4-H projects and showing various livestock, Washington County also took an active leadership role by providing the hosts for Cloverville one day.

    Volunteer teen and adult leaders helped state fair goers locate 4-H projects and be familiar with Cloverville which is the mock town that Kentucky 4-H uses to showcase all of the 4-H projects entered at the state fair.

  • Drought putting damper on state's soybean yield

    Kentucky’s soybean harvest yield estimate for September was down 8 percent from August but up 69 percent over last year at this time, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The increase is due to greater yields per acre and more acreage in soybeans. On the surface the number sounds impressive until the poor yields of 2007 are taken into consideration.

  • Follow these top seven composting secrets

    Officially composting is a controlled natural biological process where bacteria, fungi (microbes), and other organisms decompose organic wastes. This is a clever scientific definition of composting but basically it’s allowing organic material to decompose into humus or compost or basically “dirt”.

    There are several key steps in making compost and the top seven are below: