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Agriculture

  • Make your own compost and help the environment

    Have drought, wind, gas prices, economy, politics and the coming of fall got you down? You aren’t alone. So why not start thinking about compost. Yes, that’s right, compost. Why not? It will get your mind off of the many things you can’t do anything about. So, why not do something good for the environment and your garden and start a compost pile. Most people have leaves and dead plants this time of year and probably more so this year due to the drought and wind storm of late.

  • 4-H'ers win ribbons at Kentucky State Fair

    Washington County 4-H members had outstanding representation at this year’s Kentucky State Fair. Besides entering 4-H projects and showing various livestock, Washington County also took an active leadership role by providing the hosts for Cloverville one day.

    Volunteer teen and adult leaders helped state fair goers locate 4-H projects and be familiar with Cloverville which is the mock town that Kentucky 4-H uses to showcase all of the 4-H projects entered at the state fair.

  • Drought putting damper on state's soybean yield

    Kentucky’s soybean harvest yield estimate for September was down 8 percent from August but up 69 percent over last year at this time, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The increase is due to greater yields per acre and more acreage in soybeans. On the surface the number sounds impressive until the poor yields of 2007 are taken into consideration.

  • Follow these top seven composting secrets

    Officially composting is a controlled natural biological process where bacteria, fungi (microbes), and other organisms decompose organic wastes. This is a clever scientific definition of composting but basically it’s allowing organic material to decompose into humus or compost or basically “dirt”.

    There are several key steps in making compost and the top seven are below:

  • Deadline for supplemental disaster assistance is Sept. 16

    Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director Jeffery Hall reminds producers of the deadline for those who want to ensure eligibility for crop yield losses under the new Supplemental Revenue Assistance Program (SURE), Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP), Tree Assistance Program (TAP), and Emergency Assistance Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP). Sept. 16 is the last day to pay the “buy-in” fee for crops, including grazing lands that are not fully covered by crop insurance or the noninsured crop disaster assistance program (NAP).

  • Frost brings danger: Prussic acid poisoning

    As we move into October the likelihood of frost increases. The best way to prevent losses from Prussic Acid is to be aware and plan ahead. The following information will help to be aware and prepared.

    The primary cause of hydrocyanic (prussic) acid poisoning in domestic animals is the ingestion of plants containing this potent toxin. Cyanide-producing compounds (cyanogenic glucosides) occurring in living plant cells are converted to prussic acid when cells are crushed or otherwise ruptured.

  • Hay supplies up, but not back to normal

    Even though the majority of the state is in the midst of a drought, hay supplies are up from last year. However, some livestock producers will still need to find an additional hay source to get through the winter, said Tom Keene, hay marketing specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    “Overall, we are in decent to fair shape on cattle hay going into the winter,” he said. “Producers who use high quality hay to feed dairy cattle and horses will likely need to import additional quantities this year to have a sufficient supply.”

  • 4-H celebrates National 4-H Week

    What a beautiful weekend for the Crossroads Harvest Festival. Washington County 4-H members were certainly busy with their booths and hosting several shows over the weekend.

    On Saturday, over 200 rabbits and poultry entries were shown in the 4-H Spurs and Furs Youth and Open Poultry and Rabbit Show held at the National Guard Armory in Springfield. On Sunday, the 4-H Young Riders hosted a Fun Horse Show at the Willisburg Community Park. Several classes had over 15-20 entries including the egg and spoon which is always a crowd favorite.

  • Stop by 4-H booth at festival

    4-H youth from across the nation will be “Keeping It Green” as they celebrate 2008 National 4-H Week, Oct. 5-11. The theme is to help raise awareness about environmental issues and to encourage youth to initiate environmental projects that make a positive difference in their communities. Many Washington County youth over the next year will engage in learning about the environment and how they can work together as catalysts for positive change.

  • Plant hardy bulbs now

    You may have to have a back hoe or a tractor-ran posthole digger to do this, but it is time to plant fall bulbs. With the persistent drought and hard earth it seems almost light years away that spring weather and rains will return in a few months. If you want that beautiful spring garden with tulips, daffodils, crocus and hyacinths, etc. now is the time to start planting.