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Agriculture

  • Do you fertilize this fall, or not?

    As you’re probably aware, the price for agricultural inputs has dramatically increased, and fertilizer is no exception. In fact, the price of fertilizer is so high cattle producers are asking if it’s economical to apply fertilizer to pasture and hay ground this fall.

  • Thistle program available

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has contacted us about spraying thistles this fall. They will spray five farms, 10 acres which they will provide the chemical and 20 acres if the farmer provides the chemical for the additional 10 acres. They will be in our county the first of October, if you are interested, please contact Cheryl at the Extension Office, 336-7741.

    This article is from William Kanitz President Scoring Ag., Inc., Bradenton, FL, USA. We thought some of you may find it interesting.

  • Large trees need water, too

    It‘s dry, I know that is something you already knew, but there are some things you need to water even if you have decided to quit watering and gardening in general this year. Which, neither I nor any other gardener, would blame you considering the year. Basically we had one really good month for gardening and that was July.

  • Enter exhibits in county fair; more fair results announced

    This week fall officially begins and it marks the final two weeks before our local Crossroads Harvest Festival. There will be plenty activities for the family to choose from during the festival and I hope many Washington Countians will choose to participate in the festivities. Several events are actually a part of the Washington County Fair and efforts by the County Fair Board and local organizations to build excitement and participation to eventually hold a full week’s County Fair in the future.

  • "Beef Bash" to focus on beef cattle

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture and the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association will offer the inaugural Beef Bash, a unique field day for Kentucky beef cattle producers, on Sept. 23 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.

  • Dry weather may have caused cornstalk deterioration

    Farmers should examine the condition of their cornstalks because this summer’s dry weather may have caused them to deteriorate in strength, said Chad Lee, grain crops extension specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

  • Threat has passed for soybean rust this year

    The risk of damage and yield loss from soybean rust has subsided for crops in the state that are at or past the R5, or beginning seed, stage, according to a University of Kentucky plant pathologist.

    “We dodged another bullet this year,” said Don Hershman, plant pathologist in the UK College of Agriculture. “Even if spores were to arrive in the state today, it will still take them at least a month to a month-and-a-half to develop, and by that time, all of our soybeans will be made.”

  • 4-Hers excel at contest

    As I mentioned in last week’s 4-H News, it’s time for Washington County youth to register for 4-H. Even those who were members last year must fill out a registration form again this year. Most Washington County students have already received a registration form and the remainder will be handed out the first two weeks of September. Anyone needing another form may contact the Washington County Extension Office.

  • Kentucky Historic Preservation Conference to be held

    This conference will feature rural landscapes tour of historic farms and barns in Nelson and Washington Counties.

    It will begin Thursday, Sept. 4, with the following schedule:

    • 9 a.m. – meet at Wickland Historic Site in Bardstown

    The motor coach will depart from Wickland which will be open for an interpreted tour.

    • 10 a.m. – depart Wickland for Parker’s Landing

    • 10:20 a.m. – arrive at Parker’s Landing.

  • Sow grass in September

    September is the best time to sow grass and renovate your lawn. It is the natural time of year when grass seed is released and the weather is perfect for germination.

    Tall fescue should be planted at a rate of six pounds per 1000 square feet. The fine fescues should be planted at two pounds per 1000 square feet. Mixtures of tall fescue and other grass species are not recommended because of the differences in the leaf textures and mowing heights.