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Agriculture

  • Frost brings danger: Prussic acid poisoning

    As we move into October the likelihood of frost increases. The best way to prevent losses from Prussic Acid is to be aware and plan ahead. The following information will help to be aware and prepared.

    The primary cause of hydrocyanic (prussic) acid poisoning in domestic animals is the ingestion of plants containing this potent toxin. Cyanide-producing compounds (cyanogenic glucosides) occurring in living plant cells are converted to prussic acid when cells are crushed or otherwise ruptured.

  • Hay supplies up, but not back to normal

    Even though the majority of the state is in the midst of a drought, hay supplies are up from last year. However, some livestock producers will still need to find an additional hay source to get through the winter, said Tom Keene, hay marketing specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    “Overall, we are in decent to fair shape on cattle hay going into the winter,” he said. “Producers who use high quality hay to feed dairy cattle and horses will likely need to import additional quantities this year to have a sufficient supply.”

  • 4-H celebrates National 4-H Week

    What a beautiful weekend for the Crossroads Harvest Festival. Washington County 4-H members were certainly busy with their booths and hosting several shows over the weekend.

    On Saturday, over 200 rabbits and poultry entries were shown in the 4-H Spurs and Furs Youth and Open Poultry and Rabbit Show held at the National Guard Armory in Springfield. On Sunday, the 4-H Young Riders hosted a Fun Horse Show at the Willisburg Community Park. Several classes had over 15-20 entries including the egg and spoon which is always a crowd favorite.

  • Stop by 4-H booth at festival

    4-H youth from across the nation will be “Keeping It Green” as they celebrate 2008 National 4-H Week, Oct. 5-11. The theme is to help raise awareness about environmental issues and to encourage youth to initiate environmental projects that make a positive difference in their communities. Many Washington County youth over the next year will engage in learning about the environment and how they can work together as catalysts for positive change.

  • Plant hardy bulbs now

    You may have to have a back hoe or a tractor-ran posthole digger to do this, but it is time to plant fall bulbs. With the persistent drought and hard earth it seems almost light years away that spring weather and rains will return in a few months. If you want that beautiful spring garden with tulips, daffodils, crocus and hyacinths, etc. now is the time to start planting.

  • Do you fertilize this fall, or not?

    As you’re probably aware, the price for agricultural inputs has dramatically increased, and fertilizer is no exception. In fact, the price of fertilizer is so high cattle producers are asking if it’s economical to apply fertilizer to pasture and hay ground this fall.

  • Thistle program available

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has contacted us about spraying thistles this fall. They will spray five farms, 10 acres which they will provide the chemical and 20 acres if the farmer provides the chemical for the additional 10 acres. They will be in our county the first of October, if you are interested, please contact Cheryl at the Extension Office, 336-7741.

    This article is from William Kanitz President Scoring Ag., Inc., Bradenton, FL, USA. We thought some of you may find it interesting.

  • Large trees need water, too

    It‘s dry, I know that is something you already knew, but there are some things you need to water even if you have decided to quit watering and gardening in general this year. Which, neither I nor any other gardener, would blame you considering the year. Basically we had one really good month for gardening and that was July.

  • Enter exhibits in county fair; more fair results announced

    This week fall officially begins and it marks the final two weeks before our local Crossroads Harvest Festival. There will be plenty activities for the family to choose from during the festival and I hope many Washington Countians will choose to participate in the festivities. Several events are actually a part of the Washington County Fair and efforts by the County Fair Board and local organizations to build excitement and participation to eventually hold a full week’s County Fair in the future.

  • "Beef Bash" to focus on beef cattle

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture and the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association will offer the inaugural Beef Bash, a unique field day for Kentucky beef cattle producers, on Sept. 23 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.