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Agriculture

  • 4-Hers excel at contest

    As I mentioned in last week’s 4-H News, it’s time for Washington County youth to register for 4-H. Even those who were members last year must fill out a registration form again this year. Most Washington County students have already received a registration form and the remainder will be handed out the first two weeks of September. Anyone needing another form may contact the Washington County Extension Office.

  • Kentucky Historic Preservation Conference to be held

    This conference will feature rural landscapes tour of historic farms and barns in Nelson and Washington Counties.

    It will begin Thursday, Sept. 4, with the following schedule:

    • 9 a.m. – meet at Wickland Historic Site in Bardstown

    The motor coach will depart from Wickland which will be open for an interpreted tour.

    • 10 a.m. – depart Wickland for Parker’s Landing

    • 10:20 a.m. – arrive at Parker’s Landing.

  • Sow grass in September

    September is the best time to sow grass and renovate your lawn. It is the natural time of year when grass seed is released and the weather is perfect for germination.

    Tall fescue should be planted at a rate of six pounds per 1000 square feet. The fine fescues should be planted at two pounds per 1000 square feet. Mixtures of tall fescue and other grass species are not recommended because of the differences in the leaf textures and mowing heights.

  • Minor blue mold outbreak reminds farmers to practice caution

    A minor blue mold outbreak in Shelby, Henry and Oldham counties is a late-season reminder to tobacco farmers not to let their guards down just yet.

  • Indications are prices will continue to climb

    The following is from University of Kentucky Ag Economics Department. I thought it was a very good article and would like to share it with you all.

    Rising costs put farming in center of perfect storm

    For the first time in 30 years, grain farmers received a raise, but they might not see as much of it as they would like, according to a University of Kentucky agronomist. Cattle producers are facing declining revenues. Vegetable growers are feeling squeezed both on the farm and beyond the farm gate. Blame it on the soaring price of inputs.