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Local News

  • Missing woman's remains found

    The remains of a woman who was murdered in Washington County have been found.

    According to Bath County Coroner Robert Powell, Crystal Warner has been positively identified after her remains were found in Bath County earlier this week. She was murdered with her boyfriend, Robert Jones, in July.

    Kentucky State Police said the remains were found under a brush pile and sent to KSP’s central laboratory in Frankfort for identification.

  • School district looking for bus drivers

    If you have a commercial driver’s license, the Washington County Board of Education is looking for drivers. 

    According to the district’s Transportation Director, Paul Terrell, they have several drivers who could retire in the near future and the district is building a pool of substitutes they can pick from when that time comes. 

    “I would like to have six who would say, when an opening comes available, ‘I would take the position,’” Terrell said. 

  • Returning the Favor to help those in need

    Returning the Favor is back again to help those in need have a merry Christmas.

    According to Sherry Speakman, of the Willisburg Church of God, the program provides gift cards to needy families so they can have a Christmas dinner. She said the program has started off on the right foot this year.

     “We’ve got $360.65 leftover from last year, and one $40 gift card that no one cashed in,” Speakman said. “

  • Board of education receives top marks

     

    The Washington County Board of Education received a glowing report after its annual financial audit performed by White & Associates. 

    “Our responsibility is to give you an opinion on your financial statements,” Artie White said. “To make sure they’re not materially misstated, whether by intentional or unintentional error, that’s our job.” 

    If something is found, the audit company is supposed to implement a corrective action plan, however, White said, there was nothing significant to address.

  • Coyle appointed to fiscal court

    The Washington County Fiscal Court seat left open by the passing of Magistrate Morris Sweazy has been filled.

    The office of Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has announced Johnny Coyle, of Springfield, has been appointed to represent District 4 and he was sworn into office Tuesday morning prior to the court’s meeting. 

    Coyle said he was unsure if he’d be appointed the position.

    “I was really surprised, I didn’t know if it would really happen or not,” Coyle said.

  • Washington County native publishes book

    Whether you call him William, Duke, or Kenny, one thing’s for sure, this Washington County native has just published a book and he’ll be coming home for a book signing.

    William K. Haydon, of St. Louis, Missouri, has just published the book entitled “Uncle Duke Gathers his Wits or Truths or Heresies.”

    “I used to be Kenny, in Springfield,” Haydon said. “Then I became Duke … that’s the way most everybody knows me, and then I put W.K. on the title of the book.”

  • Holocaust survivor visits St. Dominic School

    Students at St. Dominic School got a lesson that can’t be taught in textbooks when Fred Gross, a Holocaust survivor, told them the harrowing tale that took him to hell and back as a toddler. 

  • City and county prepare for winter storms

    After the long dog days of summer, fall has finally arrived, and along with it, thoughts of the winter ahead.

    Springfield and Washington County have been hard at work preparing for the inevitable winter weather that causes grief for travelers each year.

    Springfielf Public Works Director Glen Mattingly said it usually take around a week for the city to prepare for winter.

  • Brothers indicted for drugs

     

    Correction: Two errors appeared on the front page of The Springfield Sun this week. This story incorrectly says that Sean D. Carney, 45, of Willisburg, was charged with trafficking marijuana 80 ounces to less than 5 pounds.  It should say 8 ounces to less than five pounds.

  • Feeding those in need

    For the last two years, Washington County Community Action and local volunteers have been giving their time with Feeding America to help feed hungry families in the county.

    “I think that helping each other and being kind to one another is vitally important,” Cabrina Buckman, an organizer, said. “It improves our society and it enriches lives.”

    On the Thursday of the second full week of each month, cars line up behind the Washington County Transfer Station to receive boxes of food assembled by the volunteers.