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Local News

  • High-speed chase goes through Washington County on KY 555

    Springfield  police officers assisted in a high-speed chase that made its way through Washington County Thursday.

    Kentucky State Police were in pursuit of a 17-year-old from Ohio, and the chase went through Springfield along KY 555.

    KSP troopers gave chase to a sport utility vehicle, reaching speeds of more than 100 miles per hour. The SUV was being driven by a 17-year-old juvenile, who was wanted in Ohio on felony robbery and assault charges, according to a report by KSP.

  • Black, Hamilton seek Democratic county clerk spot

    Republican Julie McRay Waits is preparing her bid for Washington County Clerk, but she won’t know who her opponent will be in November until Democratic incumbent Glenn Black and challenger Richard “Richie” Hamilton face off in the primary on May 18.

  • Drug bust nets 19 arrests, more possible

    Two Springfield men were arrested in a drug round-up conducted by Kentucky State Police on Friday, April 29. The round-up was the result of a year-long undercover drug investigation by Kentucky State Police, according to a statement from KSP. A total of 19 people from Washington and Marion counties were arrested in the round-up. KSP officials added that more arrests are pending in reference to the undercover investigation.

  • State of emergency declared locally

    Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles announced Tuesday that a state of emergency has been declared in the county, and Gov. Steve Beshear has requested federal assistance to help the county recover from the past weekend's storms. Settles said it is crucial that citizens take photos of any damage, save all repair receipts, and report all damage to homes and businesses to Washington County Emergency Management Director Kevin Devine at (859) 481-3919. This information will be used to help officials get all eligible assistance for which the county qualifies.

  • Weekend flooding soaks county

    The storms that rolled into Washington County Saturday morning finally started to roll out Sunday night. Before the clouds began to clear, many people had been sent in search of higher, dryer ground.

    Washington County Emergency Management Director Kevin Devine said Monday that about 10-12 families were displaced from the flooding, but there were no injuries reported.

    “Everybody is OK, but there is a lot of cleaning up to be done for them to get back in their homes,” he said.

  • City weighs recyclable paper pick-up

    As a famous fictional frog once said, “It’s not easy being green.” That is also the case when there is a possibility to expand curbside recycling in Springfield to include paper products. But while Washington County Solid Waste Coordinator George Ann Palmer would like to include the city in the program, concerns about the lack of available inmate labor and other associated costs have city officials asking more questions.

  • Safety-first thinking closes schools

    The flooding that resulted from the weekend’s heavy rain has taken its toll on the Washington County School System, forcing classes to be closed Monday.

    That day, according to Washington County Superintendent Robin Cochran, is not expected to add a day to the school year. Cochran said Monday that  she hopes the Kentucky Department of Education will approve the use of some emergency time allotted to the school system for such conditions.

  • Bible reading marathon starts May 2

    The annual Bible reading marathon will take place May 2-6 in downtown Springfield. The event will kick off at 5 p.m. at the Washington County Courthouse, and the reading will begin at 6 p.m.

    From the kickoff, someone will stand on the courthouse steps and read from the Bible around the clock through noon on Thursday, May 6, which is the National Day of Prayer. At the close of the event at noon, a special prayer service will be held for the community, the nation and the world.

  • Treasure Hunter's Roadshow buyers visit Springfield

    If you are like most folks, you probably have an attic or basement full of old things you haven’t looked at in years, and most of it is likely to be junk. Then again, there might just be some treasures in there.

  • City looks at options for old swimming pool

    Who wants to buy a pool? That’s the question the Springfield City Council was asking at its meeting on April 13. The council heard from City Attorney Bill Robinson concerning several options for the property, and the council also voted to solicit proposals from interested parties as to what they would do with the property.

    “We’re just requesting ideas that people may have for that property,” said Robinson. “That way we can weigh in and explore those options in terms of whether or not someone wants to buy it, lease it or exchange it.”