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Local News

  • Board continues superintendent interviews

    A process that started with 21 candidates has now been narrowed down to what looks to be a four-person field.

    Last week, interim Superintendent of Washington County Schools Sonny Fentress said four interviews were scheduled, with those dates being July 29, 30, and Aug. 3 and 5.

  • African-American Heritage Festival celebrated in Springfield

    Friday was a night of celebrating firsts as the sixth annual African-American Heritage Festival kicked off in downtown Springfield.

    The parade, which was the first event of the evening, featured many African-Americans from the community who were the first to reach milestones and accomplishments in their fields. Among them was Margaret Newby, Washington County’s first African-American school board member; Rosetta Smalley, Springfield’s first African-American female city council member, and many others

  • Grand jury indicts nine

    His alleged role in a string of local burglaries has brought numerous indictments against a Mount Washington man.

    James David Riggs Jr., 24, faces a total of 12 counts for allegedly burglarizing two Washington County homes, as well as a business. Riggs is charged with taking five guns and an X-Box from the home of Justice Hutchins of Newton Road.  He is also accused of stealing one four wheeler from the business of Danny Darland on Valley Hill Road and another from the home of Joe Kelty on Johnson Road.

  • Thieves take lawn, porch furniture

    Lawn and porch furniture has been a popular target for thieves lately as some local residents have had these items stolen from their front porches.

    Hooker Osbourn of 2119 Bardstown Road had approximately $1,700 worth of outdoor furniture stolen from his property on Saturday, July 18. Osbourn told Washington County Deputy Sheriff Billy Mattingly that the furniture was on the porch Friday evening when he went to bed, and he said he was at home all day on Saturday. Osbourn’s wife discovered the furniture was missing when she went out to water her flowers.

  • Volunteers complete home makeovers

    What a difference a week, some hard work and a lot of love can make. Two Springfield families have better lives now because of Fullerstock, a joint project of the Springfield Fuller Center for Housing and Habitat for Humanity. Springfield Baptist Church was the covenant partner for Fullerstock, but several groups pitched in to make this event a success.

    Volunteers both young and old, the youngest was 11 and the oldest was 86, showed up to do what they could to make life a little better for the recipients.

  • Recycling spurs friendly competition among students

    A group of local young entrepreneurs are hoping to make some green while going green. The Green Entrepreneurial Leadership Institute (GEL-IN), under the direction of the Hardin County School System, the Lincoln Trail Innovation Center and Kentucky Student Ventures Corporation, has more than 150 participants from an eight-county region.

  • African-American Heritage Festival starts tonight

    The African-American Heritage Festival begins tonight in downtown Springfield.

    This year's festival celebrates "firsts" for Springfield's African-American community.

    The festival begins with the parade at 6:30 p.m. on July 31, followed by gospel singing from 7:30-8 p.m. The group “On The Edge” will entertain from 8-9:30, and the festival wraps up with a performance by “Net’Work” from 9:30 to midnight.

    Everyone is invited to come out and enjoy the fun. For more on the festival, call (859) 336-0052, ext. 2.

  • Local families benefit from Fullerstock

    It's one thing to lend a hand to a neighbor in need. It's even better if that hand is holding a hammer, paint brush, or broom and making life a little nicer for that neighbor. Volunteers from near and far will be helping two families this week as part of Fullerstock 2009, a project under the umbrella of the Fuller Center for Housing and co-sponsored by Springfield Baptist Church. This is the first of a two-part story about Fullerstock 2009.

  • Springfield prepares for 2010 census

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    At their meeting last Tuesday, the Springfield City Council started paving the way for the construction of new housing near the intersection of Bob-O-Link Drive and Bonnie Boulevard. The council had the first reading of an ordinance to re-zone 5.3 acres from industrial to residential.

    The re-zoning was initiated by TSR, Inc., owned by Tony Royalty, who owns the land. Royalty plans to build a total of 75 condo units and hopes to begin construction on the first 16 units within 30 days.

  • 21 apply for vacant superintendent position

    When  the deadline for applications for the vacant Washington County superintendent position passed July 17, a total of 21 names had been tossed into the hat. Still, only 19 of those will be considered for the position, according to Mike Oder, superintendent search consultant with the Kentucky School Boards Association. Oder said two of the applicants turned in incomplete information, and will be removed from consideration.