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Local News

  • Nickel tax hearing set for June 2

    Washington County property owners may be looking at a slight tax increase in the future. That’s because the Washington County Board of Education will be considering the same thing several other school districts in Kentucky have: the recallable “nickel” tax.

    During last week’s meeting, board members voted to hold a public hearing regarding a recallable nickel tax, an approximate 5-cent tax on every $100 of assessed real estate and personal property. The tax does not apply to motor vehicles.  

  • Habitat for Humanity works to improve quality of life

    While many associate Habitat for Humanity as an organization that builds homes, few know that it does more than that.

    Rick Wagoner, president of My New Kentucky Home Habitat For Humanity Board this year – which serves Nelson, Marion, and Washington counties - said last week that the group also repairs homes several times a year. 

  • Springfield is home away from home for Beverley

    For more than 40 years, Christopher Beverley has traveled across the Atlantic Ocean to stay in Springfield. During that time, he’s made friends and laid the foundation for a second family – that’s because during that time, he’s come for both good times and bad.  

    Beverley first came to Springfield in 1969 as a student ambassador for the World University Service. 

  • City approves updated nuisance ordinance

    With the second reading of the nuisance ordinance already on the agenda, two Springfield citizens helped further the discussion by bringing up two separate and unrelated nuisance complaints to the Springfield City Council.

    First to speak to the council during last week’s meeting was Mark Haas, owner of Old and Odd in Nature, located on the corner of Doctor St. and Main St.

  • Hail storm causes damage in Mackville

    It’s been more than a decade since Washington County has seen this type of damage from a hail storm, and while the worst of it bypassed Springfield, it sure didn’t miss Mackville. 

    Mackville was hit by a hail storm of epic proportions on May 10. 

    Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles said he was watching the storm from Springfield when it hit. 

  • Rash of car thefts pops up locally

    Springfield residents are reminded to lock their vehicle doors and take their keys with them. 

    According to police reports, there have been several vehicle thefts in the area recently, though all of the vehicles have been recovered, and an arrest has been made. As of press time, no name was available.

  • Woman airlifted after wreck on KY 55

    A three-vehicle collision on KY 55 last week left two people injured and required a helicopter evacuation to the University of Kentucky Hospital. 

    According to a report from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, a 2004 Buick Century driven by Steven M. Key, 58 of Springfield was rear-ended as it attempted to make a right turn. Kay stated in the report that he had signaled and slowed down in order to make a turn on Old Lebanon Road when he was struck by a 1998 Dodge Dakota driven by Anthony K. Kordenbrock, 61, of Hustonville.

  • Scam hits Washington County

    Have you gotten a call from someone claiming to be from the Internal Revenue Service and demanding that you pay money? If so, don’t call them back; it’s most likely a scam. 

    According to Washington County Sheriff Jerry Pinkston and Deputy Jackie Robinson, they received numerous calls last week from Washington County citizens who have been receiving phone calls from people who are demanding that they be paid.  

  • K-9 unit starts work in Springfield

    The Springfield Police Department has a new, precise tool that’s capable of detecting drugs and finding missing people - and it’s made of flesh, blood and fur. 

    Pike, SPD’s new K-9 officer, had his first day on the job last week.

    Officer Nick Holmes, Pike’s handler, said his four-legged partner is a great asset to the community and will be very successful.

  • Greenwell retires after 46 years at extension office

    Correction: The original lead to this story states that the extension office will have to start looking for Greenwell's replacement next month. This is not correct. Greenwell is retiring this month. The story below has been corrected.

    In the last 90 years, Washington County has had only two agriculture extension agents – soon, the extension office will have to start looking for its third. 

    Rick Greenwell, Washington County’s agriculture extension agent for the last 46 years, is retiring.