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Local News

  • An image set in stone

    One Washington County Facebook group is bringing people down to earth – literally.

    “Washington County Kentucky Just Rocks” was started by Jessica Long about six months ago and has exploded in popularity in that short amount of time.

    The group, which paints rocks and hides them for others to find, has been promoting exercise for both kids and adults. Currently, it has 959 members.

    “When I started, I was hoping for 500 members,” Long said.

  • Sorghum Festival is this week

    The Sorghum Festival is one of the longest running events in Washington County’s history, and this year’s edition hopes to find success with a mix of new events and some callbacks to traditional favorites. Things will kick off on Friday, Sept. 29 at 6:30 a.m. with the Farm to City breakfast at Mordecai’s. The festival will continue throughout the weekend, with Chamber of Commerce President Pat Rose hoping that this year’s events will include something for everyone.

  • No trial date set for Pennington

    It’s been more than a year since Crystal Warner and Robert Jones were killed on Texas Road in Washington County, and their parents still have no idea when the case will go to trial.

    Friends and family of the couple waited in silence during a pretrial conference Sept. 20, as they eagerly hoped for a trial date, but instead were left with yet another drive to Springfield.

  • Peñalva joins Sun news team

    The Springfield Sun is proud to welcome a new member to its family. 

    Zack Peñalva, 23, has been hired as The Sun’s sports/news reporter. 

  • Council passes tax increase

    Springfield City Council passed a tax rate increase Tuesday night.

    During the public hearing – which had no Springfield citizens speak – City Administrator Laurie Smith went over the rate and cleared up some misconceptions. 

  • Drug problem on the rise in Springfield

    “Springfield is a quintessential small town in America,” Springfield Police Chief Jim Smith said. “But like all other towns in this great country, we have our problems like everybody else.”

    The problems the chief of police is talking about include a rising amount of drugs in the community. In fact, he said the illicit substances are getting more plentiful and cheaper.

    “I’ve been doing this job for 30 years, and this is the worst I’ve ever seen it,” Smith said. 

  • The thin blue line

    The city of Springfield is fighting to keep police officers on its streets as other local departments are offering more money for the same job.

    According to Springfield Police Chief Jim Smith, the city has lost officers in the past to other agencies and could possibly lose more in the near future.

    “It’s hard to keep and recruit good officers,” Smith said.

  • Mackville fall festival's future uncertain

    The Mackville Harvest-Homecoming Festival has brought delight to people all over the county, but this year the event was put on hold. 

    The festival, which was scheduled to take place over this past weekend, was not held, and the decision to do so was not because of money or interest, but a lack of help. 

  • Lebanon man and woman plead not guilty in hit-and-run case

    Stevie Lowery

    Landmark News Service

    Meagan Medley, 23, and Thomas E. Fleener, 26, both of 3701 Boss Luckett Road in Lebanon, have pleaded not guilty to charges connected to the hit and run death of Landon T. Wheatley, 19, of Springfield.

    Both Medley and Fleener were in Marion Circuit Court Thursday to face charges of tampering with physical evidence and leaving the scene of an accident - failure to render and/or aid assistance.

  • DACA debate hits home

    Mirna and Dora Lozano are your typical bubbly teenagers who grew up in Springfield and are working their way through college.

    Mirna, 19, and her sister, Dora, 18, aren’t United States citizens, though, and they’re worried they’ll have to leave the country in a couple of years.