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Local News

  • Holocaust survivor visits St. Dominic School

    Students at St. Dominic School got a lesson that can’t be taught in textbooks when Fred Gross, a Holocaust survivor, told them the harrowing tale that took him to hell and back as a toddler. 

  • City and county prepare for winter storms

    After the long dog days of summer, fall has finally arrived, and along with it, thoughts of the winter ahead.

    Springfield and Washington County have been hard at work preparing for the inevitable winter weather that causes grief for travelers each year.

    Springfielf Public Works Director Glen Mattingly said it usually take around a week for the city to prepare for winter.

  • Brothers indicted for drugs

     

    Correction: Two errors appeared on the front page of The Springfield Sun this week. This story incorrectly says that Sean D. Carney, 45, of Willisburg, was charged with trafficking marijuana 80 ounces to less than 5 pounds.  It should say 8 ounces to less than five pounds.

  • Feeding those in need

    For the last two years, Washington County Community Action and local volunteers have been giving their time with Feeding America to help feed hungry families in the county.

    “I think that helping each other and being kind to one another is vitally important,” Cabrina Buckman, an organizer, said. “It improves our society and it enriches lives.”

    On the Thursday of the second full week of each month, cars line up behind the Washington County Transfer Station to receive boxes of food assembled by the volunteers.

  • Saying goodbye to a hero

    Bryan Kelty was not unlike a lot of young people. He enjoyed spending time with his family, and he loved to laugh and joke. His uncle, Mike Kelty, described him as somebody who was passionate about everything he did.

    Last Sunday morning, Bryan, 24, passed away unexpectedly.

    “He was getting up to go hunting. The alarm went off, and his mom went in to check on him, and she asked him if he was going hunting. He said, ‘Yes, I think I will.’ Then he went into the bathroom to get ready, and he collapsed,” Mike said.

  • City council donates to backpack program

    Hungry children in the area will soon be able to get some food in their bellies.

    That’s because the city of Springfield has made a $500 donation to the Backpack Program, which provides nutritious food to elementary and middle school students in need.

    “It is a good program,” Mayor Debbie Wakefield said.

    Council member Chuck Polin said the program helped 64 children in the area last year, and later added there’s no waste in the program.

  • Road department building expected to be completed ahead of schedule

    Washington County’s new road department building is scheduled to be completed ahead of schedule.

    “It’s starting to take shape, it looks like a building now,” Road Department Supervisor Dale Mann said.

    Metal siding and office walls are currently being installed on the building located on Walnut Street.

  • Schrager named new Sun editor

    The Springfield Sun has a new editor.

    Nick Schrager, The Sun’s reporter for the last two years, was named the editor of the newspaper last week.

    “I can’t describe how happy I am to take on this role,” Schrager said. “This opportunity will allow me to help better serve the community.”

    Schrager was named editor after John Overby left the position open three weeks ago to take a job closer to his home in Russell Springs.

  • SCC case to stay in federal court

    A U.S. district judge rejected the move by Farmers National Bank to dismiss the St. Catharine College case from the federal court.  Farmers had asked the court to allow the claims to be heard in a Kentucky Circuit Court.  Judge David J. Hale issued the Order on Nov. 10.

  • Mental illness-related calls keep police busy

    Mental illness is a problem that has exploded across the country and is affecting law enforcement in Washington County.

    Springfield Police Chief Jim Smith said the problem uses a lot of resources and has become more common recently. The biggest problem, he said, is people reporting things that they think are happening, but really aren’t.