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Local News

  • Beer sales at Main Street festivals approved

    Beer can now be sold at Springfield Main Street festivals, pending clearance from the Kentucky League of Cities.

    This development occurred during last week’s regularly scheduled Springfield City Council meeting.

    Springfield Main Street Director Nell Haydon brought the request to the council, and a motion to do so was passed unanimously.

  • 'Happy Days' at CKCT, much more on the way

    Central Kentucky Community Theatre is in the middle of the musical “Happy Days,” but the group is already looking ahead to its new season. 

    According to Mark Colbenson, the theatre’s new managing director, it will be celebrating its 10th anniversary and will bring back some “old favorites.”

    Included in the upcoming schedule is “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” and “Nunsense.”

  • Green Festival upcoming

    Now in its third year, the Green Festival will be coming back to Springfield on April 30, to both entertain and educate people about sustainable living.

    According to Sister Claire McGowan of New Pioneers for a Sustainable Future, the purpose of the festival is to help people experience the various ways “a community can become more sustainable.”

  • Idle Hour Park celebrates 40-year anniversary

    The year was 1976.

    The nation was celebrating its bicentennial, a dollar had more than four times the buying power it does today, and the tech giant Apple was formed.

    But here in Springfield, a plot of land was christened as Idle Hour Park, a place for all to use. 

    Idle Hour Park is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, and you can be part of it. 

  • Woman dies after tractor accident

    Stevie Lowery

    Landmark News Service

     

    A Willisburg woman who was the victim of a tractor accident on April 9 has passed away.

     

    Marion County Sheriff Jimmy Clements received word from the Jefferson County Coroner Wednesday evening, April 13, that Julie Robinson, 25, was taken off life support and died.

     

  • Coyle Lane closed

    A voiceless public hearing made way to a stretch of road in Washington County being closed pending a contingency is met.

    No one spoke up during the public forum regarding the closing procedure of an 856-foot stretch of Coyle Lane during fiscal court’s Monday morning meeting. The court voted to close the road, provided a portion of it is deeded to the county. 

  • April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

    Each and every pinwheel planted in front of the 1816 courthouse represents a substantiated case of child abuse in Washington County last year. 

    April is Child Abuse Prevention Month in Springfield, Washington County and across the country. It has been recognized locally for more than 20 years, and while the county has come a long way in battling child abuse, there is still a long road ahead. 

    Sue Clements, with the Washington County Homemakers, said that while it’s an ongoing affair, they have made progress.

  • 'The Hammer' hangs it up

    They call him “The Hammer.” 

    No, not M.C. Hammer, but someone even more special – Marshall Simpson.

    Simpson, 55, has worked for the United States Postal Service since 1982 and has delivered mail in Springfield since 1993. For 23 years, he has had the same route, approximately 25,000 steps and 550 stops, in Springfield.

  • Two local residents killed in car wreck

    Washington County suffered a heavy loss last week when two of its residents were killed in a head-on collision that injured two others. 

    According to a press release from the Nelson County Sheriff’s Office, the wreck, which occurred near the county line on Bardstown Road on April 8, killed Richard Alex Hensley, 17, of Willisburg, and James B. Cambron, 56, of Springfield.

  • Carpenter wins Ag Achievement award

    “Without agriculture, what would we have?”

    Joe Carpenter posed this question as he accepted his Ag Achievement Award during the annual Springfield-Washington County Chamber of Commerce banquet.

    And for the past 30-plus years, Carpenter has been doing his part in raising awareness about just how much of an impact that agriculture has had on the Washington County community.