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Local News

  • Local community celebrates life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would have been 81 years old this year, and to celebrate his life and his dream, a group of local citizens gathered at The River of Life Church in Springfield Monday evening.

    While the event was hosted by local leaders, Rev. Billy Jenkins of Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Shepherdsville was the guest speaker at Monday’s celebration of King’s life and legacy.

    Jenkins read from the Holy Bible in the book of Genesis, 37: 5-8, which tells the story of Joseph and his dream.

  • SCC's link to Haiti provides immediate help

    In times of natural disaster, colleges and universities are often the first entities to mobilize for the collection of funds for relief efforts. But even with this quick action, it takes days, maybe weeks, to get the money into the hands of those aid organizations.

  • Taylor in the state Junior Miss spotlight

    Washington County Junior Miss Josette Taylor wrapped up a whirlwind week Saturday as she competed in the Kentucky Junior Miss competition in Lexington. After weeks of preparation and hard work, it all came down to the final week, as Josette put in 12-hour days of rehearsals in anticipation of the finals.

     

  • Springfield native helping in Haiti

    The impact of a tragedy that hit Haiti last week has been felt around the globe, but one Washington County native was there to experience it first hand.

    Marsha Garner, 60, grew up on Beechland Road in Springfield and graduated from Washington County High School, but when a 7.3-powered earthquake hit Port-Au-Prince, Haiti last week, she was only 40 miles away from the heart of the disaster.

  • County crews prepare for next round of winter weather

    Washington County Road Department crews have been working diligently to keep roads clear after last week’s snow fall. The department supervisor Albert Wimsatt told the Washington County Fiscal Court on Monday that his workers have been staying busy keeping up with Mother Nature.

  • Former deputies, five others indicted by grand jury

    Two former Washington County deputies were among seven people indicted by a local grand jury last week.

  • Second local rabies case confirmed

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Washington County officials have now confirmed a second local case of rabies. Following that news, officials are urging pet owners to have their animals vaccinated.

    “The latest report was a case of a dog being bitten by a rabid skunk and passing the rabies on to the pet,” said Sharon Browning with the Washington County Environmental Services. “Apparently the skunk got into a fight with the dog. The skunk wasn't tested, but the dog died and tested positive for rabies.”

  • Man arrested in door-to-door begging scam

    A local man is facing a Class D felony drug charge after being arrested last Thursday night by Springfield Police. Joseph K. Sparrow, 29, of Springfield, is charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and is currently being housed in the Marion County Detention Center in Lebanon with a cash bond set at $1,000.

    For the past several months, residents of Washington County may have fallen victim to Sparrow, who Springfield Police describe as a drug addict who used a door-to-door method to solicit money for his habit.

  • Time marches on for old Robinson store

    Located in Washington County just north of Sharpsville, where Routes 53 and 390 meet, sits the rundown shell of an old general store once owned by Jack and Adylee Robinson. Fifty years ago, it was the hub of the community, a place where many local residents purchased their groceries, feed, seed, and even their clothing. Today, the old store is home only to a family of stray cats. Jack  has passed away, and at 94, Adylee is spry and still kicking up her heels.

  • School system now offering alternative education program

    In a pubic school system, learning is for every student, but not all students can learn in the same settings. That’s why Superintendent of Washington County Schools Robin Cochran is excited about a new program offering an alternative to students who may not have functioned as well as possible in the traditional classroom setting.

    The new alternative program offered at Washington County High School is a program Cochran has long believed was needed in the local school system, and she’s glad to see it coming to fruition.