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Local News

  • Springfield Police chief Armstrong will retire


    After over 40 years in criminal justice, Springfield Police Chief Fred Armstrong is set to retire.

  • Vineyards, wineries make a comeback


    Before tobacco was king in Kentucky, grapes were a majestic crop.
    Around the time of the Civil War and Prohibition, Kentucky was the nation’s third largest grape-producing state.
    “When that was, it was prior to the Civil War, and the war itself disrupted the whole thing,” Rick Greenwell, Washington County agricultural extension agent, said. “Then Prohibition finished it off, which is what put us into the modern day agriculture that ended several years ago.”

  • Washington County ranked seventh healthiest county in the state according to new report


    Keep living a healthy lifestyle, Washington County. It’s paying off.

    According to research released by the University of Wisconsin in Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Washington County is the seventh healthiest county in the state.
    Boone, Oldham, Calloway, Woodford, Scott and Lyon counties are the six counties that ranked above Washington County, with Boone being the healthiest.

  • Pinkston finds his calling in law enforcement


    There’s a new sheriff’s deputy in town.
    Jerry Pinkston recently hit the streets of Washington County as a new deputy.

    Pinkston is a new officer, but law enforcement is something he has always wanted to do.
    “I had interest in law enforcement when I was in high school, I just never had a good opportunity to do it,” he said.
    Pinkston provided court security at the judicial center before he was offered a job by sheriff Tommy Bartley.
    In his spare time, he also farms and runs a repair shop in East Texas.

  • April is child abuse prevention month


    Washington County volunteer Pat Sutton has been campaigning against child abuse for 15 years now.
    Unfortunately, her fight has to continue again this month during Child Abuse Prevention month.

    Sutton spoke before the Washington County Fiscal Court on March 25 during the regular scheduled meeting.
    She said she didn’t  think Kentucky was ranked first in the nation for child abuse cases, but it still ranked very high.

  • SCC volunteers are New Orleans bound


    Sometimes giving inspires more giving.
    Such is the case at St. Catharine College, where a group of student and staff volunteers have inspired others to volunteer.

    Last spring, a group of seven students and staff traveled to New Orleans, La., to help homeowners rebuild.
    The group collaborated with an organization called Nuns Build, which consists of Dominican Sisters.
    The group from SCC was so moved, they decided to share their experience with the rest of the college.

  • County clerk goes under budget, returns $75,000


    Washington County Clerk Glenn Black had a nice surprise for the fiscal court during the new business portion of its regular scheduled meeting on Monday.

    Black presented the county with $75,000, money that was in excess of the operating budget required by the clerk’s office.
    “We could get used to that,” judge-executive John Settles said.
    “I just hope we can keep it up,” Black said. “I can’t guarantee that.”

  • City begins layoffs

    One city employee has been laid off, and the mayor and city administrator indicate that more layoffs are possible.
    The Springfield Sun obtained a copy of a letter from Mayor Dr. John Cecconi detailing the layoff.
    The letter was addressed from the mayor to former Springfield employee Michael Bonzo, who worked for the city’s public works department. The letter, dated March 9, informed Bonzo that he would be laid off, effective immediately, due to budget constraints the city is facing.

  • Fuller Center taking applications for home ownership


    The Springfield Fuller Center for Housing is looking for families interested in owning a home.

    The home was donated to the center in 2009 by St. Catharine College. The Fuller Center moved the home from there to 703 Claybrooke Ave.
    Cathy Carrico, secretary of the Springfield Fuller Center for Housing, said applications to be considered for the home can be picked up at Cornerstone Christian Church or at Community Action.

  • Animal neglect a concern for county officials


    Washington County Sheriff Tommy Bartley thinks animal neglect cases, especially in horses, are on the rise.
     
    Bartley spoke before the fiscal court on Jan.  31 during a special-called meeting.
    Bartley said he contacted  the Marion County Animal Shelter about what could be done about neglected large animals. Since Washington County has no animal shelter, it has a contract with Marion County’s shelter to pick up stray dogs.