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Local News

  • Bartley is top vote-getter in sheriff's race; all local incumbents win

    Washington Countians like their politics, and apparently, they liked them just they way they were before Tuesday’s primary election. When the votes were totaled, no changes took place in the local political ranks.

    In what was no doubt the most discussed race in the county for the primary election, Washington County Sheriff Tommy Bartley held off challengers Alan Corbett and Brad Langford by a total of 1,404 votes to Corbett’s 900 and Langford’s 466.

  • SCC holds 78th commencement

    When St. Catharine College moved from a junior college to a four-year institution in 2004, President William D. Huston said the school would soon be recognized as a destination college, rather than a transitional one. That designation became very evident Saturday at the 78th commencement ceremony held in Lourdes Hall.

    For the first time in St. Catharine history the number of bachelor’s degrees granted were more than the associate degrees awarded. A total of 54 graduates received bachelor’s degrees, while 50 were granted associate degrees.

  • Two local landmarks could receive national recognition

    Two Washington County properties are among nine in the state that are on the road to being placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kalarama Farm and Maple Grove, also known as the Old Settles Place or Hardin House, had their applications approved during a meeting of the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board last week.

  • City council addresses nuisance issues

    At Tuesday’s Springfield City Council meeting, several council members brought up nuisance problems concerning barking animals and junk vehicles, and they discussed the problems with police chief Fred Armstrong.

  • Marion County Area Technology Center also serves Washington County students

    It’s located across the county line, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a benefit to Washington County.

    The Marion County Area Technology Center (MCATC) serves students from Washington County, as well as Marion County, and provides training to get the young people of both counties ready for their careers.

    Principal Laura Arnold, a Washington County resident, said the center is on the property of the Marion County School District, but is operated by state agencies.

  • Springfield native acquitted of felony murder, guilty of facilitation of murder, other charges

    KNOXVILLE - Jurors acquitted Springfield native and 2006 Washington County High School graduate Vanessa Coleman of first-degree murder Thursday in the January 2007 torture-slayings of a West Knox County, Tenn., couple who were carjacked while on a date.

    They convicted Coleman of facilitation of felony murder and other lesser charges in the death of University of Tennessee student Channon Christian, 21, but acquitted Coleman of charges in the death of Christian's boyfriend, Christopher Newsom, 23, a trim carpenter.

    The verdicts came in the ninth day of the trial.

  • Incumbent Bartley faces Corbett, Langford for Democratic nod in sheriff's race

    Jim Crouch is a wanted man. The Republican candidate for Washington County Sheriff has three Democrats fighting for a chance to go one-on-one with him in the Nov. 2 general election. But before he knows who will be his opponent this fall, the three Democrats must see who wins the battle of the ballot in the May 18 primary.

  • ECTC dedicates Springfield campus

    The seeds of higher education were planted in Washington County nearly two years ago when ground was broken for the Springfield campus of the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College System. Now, the campus is in full bloom and ready to receive its first full-time students this fall. A ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremony took place Thursday afternoon to unveil the newest addition to the KCTCS.

  • St. Catharine students raising funds for mission trip with Saturday night dance

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  • Flood's wake leaves county roads a mess

    In the wake of last week’s massive flooding, several roads throughout Washington County have sustained severe damage, and are in need of emergency repair. At Monday’s meeting of the Washington County Fiscal Court, road department supervisor Albert Wimsatt reported that his crews have been working to clean up the debris while inspectors from FEMA are expected to arrive this week to assess the damage.