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Local News

  • Rumpke fuel surcharges to increase trash bills

    Nobody likes to see a higher-than-expected bill in the mail, but residents of Washington County will see a slight increase in their quarterly trash bill from Rumpke. The culprit is a multi-tiered fuel surcharge that the company imposes when fuel prices pass a certain level.

    Three percent is added onto the flat $39.00 quarterly trash fee if fuel prices go above $2.50 per gallon, with additional three-perfect increases every 25 cents. The Washington County Fiscal Court discussed the surcharge during its meeting held on Friday.

  • Four juveniles charged after racist graffiti spray painted

    Four juveniles have been charged by Springfield Police after graffiti depicting racist phrases and logos were painted on several local buildings, signs and other property.

  • Popular stray dog, 10 puppies seeking a home

    The workers at McDonald’s call her Big Mac, and now, she has 10 little McNuggets to go along with her. The female Golden Retriever seen around parking lots of area restaurants and grocery stores is probably the best-known stray dog you’ll ever see. People routinely feed her, including the McDonald’s staff members, who toss her biscuits and other food when she’s in the area. Now, she has been picked up by a caring local woman, and the dog has been discovered to have a litter of 10 puppies in need of a home.

  • Mini Relay for Life raises more than $2,000

    The threat of inclement weather didn’t dampen the cancer-fighting spirit of Washington County Middle School on May 14 as they held their annual mini Relay for Life. While the festivities started at the high school football field, things were quickly moved indoors into the middle school gym after a brief sprinkle of rain fell just after noon. In total, the students raised approximately $2,000 for the WCMS Relay for Life team.

  • School board makes reductions in staff

    The lack of a state budget has continued to have an impact on numerous groups across the state, and the Washington County School District is the latest to be affected.

  • Middle school students get a dose of reality

    If you’ve been out of school for a while, then you know that it’s a dog-eat-dog world out there. It takes some adjustment to learn how to handle monthly bills and expenses. But some Washington County middle school students recently got a preview of what to expect once they enter the workforce by participating in a “reality store” at North Washington Elementary School on Friday.

  • Coleman not guilty of felony murder; Jury finds her guilty of facilitating crimes

    A Davidson County, Tenn., jury Thursday declared Washington County native Vanessa Coleman not guilty in one death, but guilty of being a facilitator in another that resulted from a series of crimes involving a Knox County, Tenn., couple.

    Coleman, a 2006 Washington County High School graduate, was arrested Jan. 31, 2007, and faced numerous charges in relation to the deaths of Channon Christian, 21, and Chris Newsom, 23, in Knoxville.

  • Bartley is top vote-getter in sheriff's race; all local incumbents win

    Washington Countians like their politics, and apparently, they liked them just they way they were before Tuesday’s primary election. When the votes were totaled, no changes took place in the local political ranks.

    In what was no doubt the most discussed race in the county for the primary election, Washington County Sheriff Tommy Bartley held off challengers Alan Corbett and Brad Langford by a total of 1,404 votes to Corbett’s 900 and Langford’s 466.

  • SCC holds 78th commencement

    When St. Catharine College moved from a junior college to a four-year institution in 2004, President William D. Huston said the school would soon be recognized as a destination college, rather than a transitional one. That designation became very evident Saturday at the 78th commencement ceremony held in Lourdes Hall.

    For the first time in St. Catharine history the number of bachelor’s degrees granted were more than the associate degrees awarded. A total of 54 graduates received bachelor’s degrees, while 50 were granted associate degrees.

  • Two local landmarks could receive national recognition

    Two Washington County properties are among nine in the state that are on the road to being placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kalarama Farm and Maple Grove, also known as the Old Settles Place or Hardin House, had their applications approved during a meeting of the Kentucky Historic Preservation Review Board last week.