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Local News

  • Local man killed in tractor accident

    A 61-year-old Washington County man was killed in a farm accident Thursday afternoon, according to Kentucky State Police.

    Mark Falkenstein of Springfield was operating a tractor that was towing another tractor uphill when the tractor he was driving overturned, pinning him beneath it. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

    For more on this story, see next week's issue of The Springfield Sun.

  • Local FEMA office will close Saturday at 6 p.m.

    After just opening Monday morning, the Springfield Disaster Recovery Center located in the Washington County Court Annex at 111 North Cross Main Street, will close its doors for business Saturday at 6 p.m.

  • FEMA repairing lives, rebuilding homes

    Tom and Mary Ann Tingle have been married for 13 years. They have lived in their home on Midway Lane off Bloomfield Road since they married, and Tom has owned the property since 1982. When heavy rains and flooding took place the first weekend of May, it was nothing new to the Tingles. They had seen flooding before, and although they had suffered damage in the past, they had recovered and been able to return to their home.

  • Relay for Life: Local woman's fight with cancer

    One minute, your life can be normal and full of simple pleasures. The next minute, your world can spiral into a whirlwind of emotions. That is the chaos that cancer can create, and no one knows the ups and downs of battling the dreaded disease more than Janice Brady.

  • WCHS sophomore earns art scholarship at University of Iowa

    Washington County High School sophomore Benji Gaona was recently awarded a scholarship to attend the National Scholars Institute, a one-week residential summer academic program at the Belin-Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development on the campus of the University of Iowa. From July 4-9, he will take part in the Visual Arts Studio single advanced level course.

  • Meet our new neighbors;Amish community growing locally

    If you’ve driven in the northern end of Washington County recently, you may have seen the signs that indicate you have some new neighbors. If not, keep your eyes open. The signs are bright yellow, and feature the image of a horse and buggy.

    The signs are to alert motorists of some of the county’s newest residents on the roadways. They come to Kentucky from Holmes County, Ohio, and are establishing a new Amish community in the Willisburg area.

  • County's fifth-graders learn about safety

    Fifth-grade students from across Washington County spent a day in the sun at Willisburg Park learning about safety last Tuesday during the 2nd annual Safety Day.

  • 139 graduate in WCHS Class of 2010

    A lifetime of hard work and dedication wrapped up another chapter in the lives of the members of Washington County High School’s Class of 2010 Friday night. At the school’s annual graduation ceremony, 139 seniors received diplomas and were recognized for their numerous accomplishments.

    Washington County High School counselor Lolita Blanton said this group has been a pleasure to work with, and she sees good things in the future for the class.

  • Construction date changed for Habitat House to accommodate volunteers

    Steven and Carolyn Hash are Taylor County natives, but they are now proud to call Washington County their home. Soon, they will even be moreIn scheduling the construction date for the new Habitat for Humanity house for Steven and Carolyn Hash, organizers had originally set the dates for June 19-20, overlooking the fact those dates fell on Father's Day weekend. Now, the dates have been moved to June 26-27 to allow more volunteers to participate. For more information, contact John Wharton at (859) 481-4091.

  • Fredericktown native's art tells story of historic day

    Nearly 70 years ago, a group of young men from Washington County gathered at the local train station, ready to serve their country in the military. Their destination was Camp Hulen, Texas, and their families thought they would return in a year. Instead of returning home, they eventually went to war.