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Local News

  • Local auto industry still in high gear

    Much of the automobile industry has found itself stuck in low gear lately, and with the recall of several models of Toyota vehicles, you might expect factories producing parts for the company to slow down or come to a complete stop, but that has not been the case.

    Dianne Kelly, human resources manager for Toyotomi, said the company is not only maintaining its production staff, but it’s looking to fill some open positions.

  • County scraps bulky item pick-up

    It worked so well last year that the Washington County Fiscal Court is once again scrapping the idea of a county-wide clean-up in favor of allowing county residents to dump bulky items at the county’s transfer station for free. The free drop-off takes effect on March 1 and will run through Sept. 1. This is for residential items only, no tires or commercial debris will be allowed to dump free of charge. Contractors will still be able to dump CD&D waste for the normal fee.

  • Smile Kentucky! gives free dental service to local kids

    Some Washington County students had plenty to smile about Friday afternoon when they returned from a unique trip to visit the dentist.

    Thirteen students from North Washington and Washington County elementary schools took part in the Smile Kentucky! program Friday, where they received free dental care courtesy of the University of Louisville, along with several corporate sponsors. When the day was done, more than $4,300 worth of free dental care was provided to the local students.

  • Mackville man charged in plot to kill Wendy's manager

    Two men accused of plotting to kill the manager of a Danville fast food restaurant last year will have pretrial conferences next month.

    William Tate, 24, of Mackville, and Tad Shelton, 23, of Hustonville, are charged with conspiracy to commit murder for allegedly planning to kill a manager at Wendy’s on Hustonville Road.

    Attorneys for the two men appeared at a status hearing Tuesday in Boyle Circuit Court, when their pretrial conferences were set for March 2 before Judge Darren Peckler.

  • County's tobacco past makes way for future business

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The tell-tale signs of growing older eventually become apparent on our faces and in our community. While in their youth and their prime, businesses once rich with success and promise were the backbone of our local economy. But everything eventually changes, and over time, the future becomes the present, and the present becomes the past.

  • Heartland Youth aims to prevent substance abuse

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Nobody knows the social pressures that today's youths face quite like their peers. That's why members of the Washington County Heartland Youth Coalition are taking a proactive stance on hot-button issues like underage drinking and smoking. The group's mission statement clearly defines its goal - “To engage, enrich and empower the citizens and agencies of Springfield and Washington County to build a stronger and safer community by reducing substance abuse.”

  • County seeks "StormReady" designation

    There’s no better time than now to prepare for the future, especially when an event such as a storm or disaster occurs. That’s why Washington County is taking the first steps toward becoming what the National Weather Service calls a “StormReady” county.

  • Elected officials: How much do they earn?

    Elected officials are paid from your tax money. So how much do county officials make on the job?

    The salaries of elected officials are set by the state, and follow a scale provided by Kentucky’s Department of Local Government. The salaries are based on the experience of the person in office, as well as the size of the county which they serve.

    The state mandates salaries for the positions of county judge-executive, county clerk, sheriff and jailer (operating a full service jail) for Washington County based on the population of 11,399 as reported in the 2002 census.

  • New book chronicles legacy of local Civil War soldiers

    It was an era in American history that pitted countryman against countryman, neighbor against neighbor, and even brother against brother. The Civil War has been well documented over the past 145 years, and now some of Washington County’s Civil War legacy is featured in a book entitled “The 10th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War,” where author Dennis W. Belcher chronicles the formation and history of the storied regiment that fought for the Union Army for three years, having been formed in Lebanon on Nov. 21, 1861.

  • Local teacher receives 'master teacher' training

    Even teachers like to learn new things, and nobody knows that better than Washington County High School math teacher Rita Messer. She recently took part in the Master Teacher Project in Hilton Head, S.C., facilitated through the Appalachian Math Science Partnership.

    The program is designed to challenge the 15 participating teachers to, first and foremost, fine tune their own teaching skills, and then share their knowledge and skills with other educators in their school, district and/or region.