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Local News

  • CATS tests show local schools highly ranked

    The Washington County School District has been recognized by the Kentucky Department of Education as an “exemplary growth district” following the recent release of scores from the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System (CATS).

    Only 64 of Kentucky’s 175 school districts have received this recognition. All schools in the district are progressing or meeting their goals, and the schools have also met the dropout and novice reduction goals set by the state. As a district, they rank fifth out of 18 districts in this region.

  • Sammi to the rescue!

    He stands about six inches tall, and he weighs 15 pounds, but don’t let his size fool you. Sammi is a big little dog.

    He’s not your typical super hero, but Sammi came to the rescue for Kathy Harvey and her son Kyle three years ago, and now, he’s part of the family.

    Kyle, 22, is autistic. In addition, he began to have unrelated seizures more than three years ago. Kathy said that was when she became concerned for his safety. Kyle had wanted a dog, but Kathy never imagined that a dog would be able to help with Kyle’s seizures.

  • In honor...

    Clyde Logsdon caught a plane to Washington D.C., this morning. The plane has landed by now, but Clyde is probably still a few feet off the ground, likely somewhere around Cloud 9.

    Logsdon, 87, is a Washington County native and a veteran of World War II. He and his daughter, Kathy Mattingly, left Louisville this morning as part of a trip to the nation’s capital aboard a flight operated by a veteran’s support group called Honor Flight.

  • Charcoal truck wrecks on KY 555

    A tractor-trailer filled with bags of charcoal went over a guardrail late Wednesday evening near the intersection of KY 555 and US 150. Kentucky State Police were called to the scene around 9:40 p.m. Wednesday. The accident was the result of brake problems reported by the driver, who was not injured, according to emergency officials. The wreckage was finally cleared from the scene around 7:30 a.m. Thursday morning.

    Photo courtesy of Tony Golden

  • No increase on school tax rate

    At a time when a poor economy is putting a pinch on almost everybody’s budget, higher taxes are the last thing most people need. Recognizing that, the Washington County School Board voted in a special meeting Thursday to keep its tax rate exactly the same as it was last year.

  • Grundy Plantation recognized as historic site

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Hugh L. Grundy, 93, of Springfield, has enjoyed a career in aviation that has taken him around the world. But whether he was in Hong Kong, New York City, Cairo, Shanghai or Los Angeles, the place he would rather be was his family’s plantation right here in Washington County.

    “In all my travels I have never seen a place more peaceful than right here,” said Grundy. “They say you can’t go home, but here I am.”

  • Willisburg will buy new fire truck at cost of $184,585

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The Willisburg Fire Department will be getting a new fire truck around the end of October or the beginning of November. The total cost is $184,585. A state loan will cover $75,000 while an additional $70,000 will be covered by a loan from the Kentucky Association of Counties. The Washington County fiscal court approved the loan from KACO at its Monday meeting. The remaining $39,585 will be paid by the fire department from funds on hand.

  • Fredericktown to celebrate Patriot Day

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    It was one of the most tragic days in our country's history, and those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, will never be forgotten. That's the goal of a special ceremony being held in Fredericktown, as well as honoring those who continue to serve today.

  • County road workers to start 10-hour work days as of Sept. 8

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Starting Sept. 8, the Washington County Road Department will start a 30-day test program, working four 10-hour days a week instead of the traditional five eight-hour days.

    Road department supervisor Albert Wimsatt says he's received positive feedback from his employees about the shorter work week.

  • Second annual Kentucky Crossroads Harvest Festival on the horizon

    As fall approaches, with it will come the second annual Kentucky Crossroads Harvest Festival.

    The festival officially begins on Friday, Oct. 3, but this year will feature a special event that kicks things off on Sept. 27.