.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • High school students caught with marijuana

    An incident that took place just as the school day began Tuesday at Washington County High School has ended in two students being charged with marijuana trafficking.

    According to a report from the Springfield Police Department, Sgt. Cliff Peek was called to the school after administrators observed two students acting suspiciously and passing something under a table in the cafeteria. Upon searching one of the students, administrators found a bag containing 17 grams of marijuana, according to Peek. He said the marijuana is valued at approximately $300.

  • Washington County joins lawsuit to recover jail funds from state

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Washington County has joined a lawsuit proposed by the Kentucky County Judge/Executives Association against the state of Kentucky. The lawsuit would ask the state to compensate counties for housing state felony prisoners who get credit for time served in county jails.

  • Main Street resurfacing project under way

    Main Street in Springfield was officially closed for parking Monday morning as a resurfacing project began that is expected to be completed within one to two weeks.

    Chad Filiatreau, resident engineer with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, said work began at 7 a.m. Monday on a stretch of road covering 2.1 miles. The project, which will cost $266,300, goes from the intersection of KY 555/150/55 and goes through downtown Springfield, taking a right turn beside the Washington County Board of Education building, and ending at the intersection of the KY 150 bypass.

  • Marriage seminar, concerts coming to town Sept. 12-14

    It’s no secret that today’s church members are not free from problems. When it comes to divorce, Clay Stevens, pastor of Springfield Presbyterian Church, said the problem is probably as great in the church as it is outside.

    “We live in a throw-away culture. Everything gets thrown away, but the family is not a throw-away item,” said Stevens. “Stats show that in the church, we don’t have any less divorce rate than there is outside the church. The church needs to be strengthened in its commitment to marriage.”

  • Cream of the crop

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The next time you pour milk on your breakfast cereal, put a slice of cheese on your ham sandwich, or dish up a big bowl of ice cream, think about where the milk came from to produce those products. The judges at this year’s Kentucky State Fair know where the best milk produced in Kentucky comes from, and that’s Coulter Family Dairy in Springfield.

  • New school traffic pattern starts Sept. 8

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    During the 2007-08 school year, traffic for afternoon dismissal at Washington County Elementary School was among the largest problems on the plate of the school. While the officials looked for a smooth-running system to dismiss students being picked up by parents, local police were busy trying to keep Doctor Street, which lies behind the school, clear of traffic jams.

  • Ballot set for local election

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    When Washington County voters go to the polls this fall, they will have some choices in several local races.

    Three school board seats will be up for election, but only two of the current members will face opposition.

  • Brown leaving school system for state education job

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    They say you can’t go home again, but Robert Brown doesn’t agree.

    For the past two years, Brown has served as assistant superintendent of Washington County Schools, but Friday was his last day on the job. He leaves Washington County to return to the job he previously held for three years in Frankfort as director in the division of professional learning and assessment at the Education and Professional Standards Board in Frankfort.

  • City moves forward on golf cart law

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    At their meeting held on Aug. 12, Springfield city council voted unanimously to proceed with a city ordinance that would allow the use of golf carts on streets within the city limits.

    Although the paperwork was put into motion, nothing has passed as of yet ,and it is still illegal to drive a golf cart on public streets in Springfield, according to Springfield Police Chief Fred Armstrong.

  • Local man looks to beat gas prices with mini trucks

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    Lynn Wimsatt is like most people in this area when it comes to the high gas prices these days. He’s tired of paying them, and he’s ready to find a new solution. Actually, he thinks he may have found a way to beat the gas prices. Now, he just needs to have it legalized.