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Local News

  • St. Catharine breaks ground on new dorm

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    St. Catharine College broke ground on a new student dormitory on Aug. 11. The addition, estimated to cost $4.8 million, will provide housing for 74 students, plus include meeting rooms, lounge areas, a kitchen and a multi-purpose lobby. The resident director will have a two-bedroom apartment on site.

    “We’re very excited about the new dormitory,” said SCC president William Huston. “That will basically accommodate what we know we have this year.”

  • Willisburg break-ins concern residents

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    Several Willisburg residents are living in fear in their own homes, and they are tired of it.

    Following a recent break-in attempt and at least three arrests of men from the Isaiah House/R6 Mentoring programs housed at the old Willisburg school, some residents say they are tired of living in fear.

  • Springfield facelifts making a difference

    By Jennifer Corbett

    Sun Summer Intern

    Since the 1800s, the Washington County Courthouse has been the center of downtown Springfield, along with a booming economy with numerous businesses locating here.

    Now, almost 200 years later, the same structures are still standing, and Springfield officials want to maintain them as they are.

  • The wheels on the bus

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    Murray Walker rolled out of bed Tuesday morning and climbed behind the steering wheel of a bus for the first day of school. It’s nothing new for Walker, who at age 70, started his 44th year as a bus driver Tuesday.

  • Springfield celebrates African-American heritage

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The streets of downtown Springfield were filled with food, fun and entertainment on Friday, Aug. 1, as the city held its 5th annual African-American Heritage Festival. The event recognizes and celebrates the contributions that African-Americans have made to the community. This year's event focused on the importance of education in children's lives.

  • Living in the past

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Most people prefer to learn about the Civil War by reading about it in a book or watching a film. Lee Lewis, of Willisburg, would rather learn about it by dressing the part and participating in battle re-enactments.

    “I learn something new at every event,” said Lewis. “The more you learn about the past, the more you appreciate what you have now.”

  • New bridge opens at Maker's Mark

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The Washington County Fiscal Court announced that a new Maker's Mark Bridge was completed on July 24. The bridge opened for traffic on the morning of Monday, July 28.

    The old bridge, which was damaged earlier in the month when an abutment fell into the creek, was torn down and replaced for approximately $52,000. $50,000 of that cost was paid for by Marion County through emergency funds.

  • School board filing deadline is Aug. 12

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    Three of the five seats on the Washington County School Board are up for election this year, but so far, nobody has tossed their name into the hat to oppose the people who currently fill those seats for a four-year term on the board.

    The three districts to be decided this fall are held by Patsy Lester, who is the board chair serving from District 3, Margaret Newby of District 4, and Pat Clements of District 5.

  • African American Heritage Festival is this weekend

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    For the fifth consecutive year, Washington County will celebrate its heritage this weekend as the 2008 African American Heritage Festival kicks off in downtown Springfield.

    Nell Haydon, director of the Springfield’s Main Street Renaissance Program, said this year’s event will pay tribute to African American educators. The festival will begin with a new event featuring a special panel of educators at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, July 31 at the Opera House.

  • Local farmer's cows killed when struck by lightning

    By Jennifer Corbett

    Sun Summer Intern

    It had seemed like a normal day when Kevin Coulter left six cows and a bull to graze near a tree on his farm July 21.

    Soon it began to rain, so Coulter waited an hour before he went back to his cattle.

    But when he came back, all of them were dead. They had all been struck by lightning.