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Local News

  • No increase on school tax rate

    At a time when a poor economy is putting a pinch on almost everybody’s budget, higher taxes are the last thing most people need. Recognizing that, the Washington County School Board voted in a special meeting Thursday to keep its tax rate exactly the same as it was last year.

  • Grundy Plantation recognized as historic site

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Hugh L. Grundy, 93, of Springfield, has enjoyed a career in aviation that has taken him around the world. But whether he was in Hong Kong, New York City, Cairo, Shanghai or Los Angeles, the place he would rather be was his family’s plantation right here in Washington County.

    “In all my travels I have never seen a place more peaceful than right here,” said Grundy. “They say you can’t go home, but here I am.”

  • Willisburg will buy new fire truck at cost of $184,585

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    The Willisburg Fire Department will be getting a new fire truck around the end of October or the beginning of November. The total cost is $184,585. A state loan will cover $75,000 while an additional $70,000 will be covered by a loan from the Kentucky Association of Counties. The Washington County fiscal court approved the loan from KACO at its Monday meeting. The remaining $39,585 will be paid by the fire department from funds on hand.

  • Fredericktown to celebrate Patriot Day

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    It was one of the most tragic days in our country's history, and those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, will never be forgotten. That's the goal of a special ceremony being held in Fredericktown, as well as honoring those who continue to serve today.

  • County road workers to start 10-hour work days as of Sept. 8

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Starting Sept. 8, the Washington County Road Department will start a 30-day test program, working four 10-hour days a week instead of the traditional five eight-hour days.

    Road department supervisor Albert Wimsatt says he's received positive feedback from his employees about the shorter work week.

  • Second annual Kentucky Crossroads Harvest Festival on the horizon

    As fall approaches, with it will come the second annual Kentucky Crossroads Harvest Festival.

    The festival officially begins on Friday, Oct. 3, but this year will feature a special event that kicks things off on Sept. 27.

  • High school students caught with marijuana

    An incident that took place just as the school day began Tuesday at Washington County High School has ended in two students being charged with marijuana trafficking.

    According to a report from the Springfield Police Department, Sgt. Cliff Peek was called to the school after administrators observed two students acting suspiciously and passing something under a table in the cafeteria. Upon searching one of the students, administrators found a bag containing 17 grams of marijuana, according to Peek. He said the marijuana is valued at approximately $300.

  • Washington County joins lawsuit to recover jail funds from state

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Staff Writer

    Washington County has joined a lawsuit proposed by the Kentucky County Judge/Executives Association against the state of Kentucky. The lawsuit would ask the state to compensate counties for housing state felony prisoners who get credit for time served in county jails.

  • Main Street resurfacing project under way

    Main Street in Springfield was officially closed for parking Monday morning as a resurfacing project began that is expected to be completed within one to two weeks.

    Chad Filiatreau, resident engineer with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, said work began at 7 a.m. Monday on a stretch of road covering 2.1 miles. The project, which will cost $266,300, goes from the intersection of KY 555/150/55 and goes through downtown Springfield, taking a right turn beside the Washington County Board of Education building, and ending at the intersection of the KY 150 bypass.

  • Marriage seminar, concerts coming to town Sept. 12-14

    It’s no secret that today’s church members are not free from problems. When it comes to divorce, Clay Stevens, pastor of Springfield Presbyterian Church, said the problem is probably as great in the church as it is outside.

    “We live in a throw-away culture. Everything gets thrown away, but the family is not a throw-away item,” said Stevens. “Stats show that in the church, we don’t have any less divorce rate than there is outside the church. The church needs to be strengthened in its commitment to marriage.”