Local News

  • Body cameras prove useful to police department

    It’s been about a year since the Springfield Police Department started using body cameras, and according to Police Chief Jim Smith, the Vid-Shields have been very useful for the department.

    “I’ve been very pleased with them,” Smith said. “We all have.”

    The cameras cost the department around $300-$400 a piece, but lack some of the features of higher-end units. Despite this, though, they only cost a fraction of what some body cameras cost.

    “So far, these seem to hold up pretty good,” Smith said. 

  • A Day in the Life ... of a veterinarian

    8 a.m. — open for business.

    The rising sun blazed through the glass doors, illuminating the room a burnt orange. The air was filled with a sharp, pungent smell.

    On the examination table, a wheezing patient breathed almost uncontrollably, though no one seemed to notice.

    The doctor examined her carefully, ignoring the breathing of what sounded like a clogged carpet shampooer.

    She took out her stethoscope and listened to her heartbeat. All was normal.

    After a shot, she was cleared to go.

  • Commanderettes improve to 6-3

    The Washington County Commanderettes (6-3, 2-1) picked up their second district win of the season last week when they defeated the Nelson County Cardinals (7-3, 0-1) three games to two.

    The Commanderettes took the opening set by a score of 25-19, accounting for the largest margin in the tightly contested match.

    Nelson County responded by taking the next two sets 27-25 and 25-21.

  • WC gets first win after late-game rally

    Trick plays were on full display by the Washington County Commanders (1-2) in their thrilling 40-36 victory over the Kentucky Country Day Bearcats (1-2) last Friday night.

    A fake punt, an onside kick and two touchdown passes thrown by someone other than the quarterback were all part of WC’s arsenal in pulling out its first win of the season.

  • Renovations moving forward on old high school

    Immediately after voting on the tax rate, the Washington County Board of Education held its regularly scheduled meeting. The main topic of concern during the evening’s meeting was the old high school renovation.

    Jean-Paul Grivas, vice president of Patrick D. Murphy Architects, gave a slideshow presentation to the board, which gave an overview of options and prices.

    The board elected to move forward to the next steps of the process where the company will begin tightening up the budget and start on some more field studies.

  • Willisburg man injured in wreck

    A motorcycle wreck Friday left one man severely injured when he was thrown from his motorcycle.

    No official report was available at press time, but according to his father, William “Bloop” Johnson, Russell William Johnson, 36, of Willisburg, was thrown from his motorcycle on Loretto Road and suffered a severe leg injury.

    Washington County EMS and the sheriff’s office responded to the accident and Johnson was airlifted to the University of Louisville Hospital.

  • Accused murderer indicted

    A Washington County grand jury returned a murder charge against Hoyt J. Calhoun of Boston, Ky., recently, while indicting six others, including two on drug production and cultivation charges. 

    Calhoun, 51, of Icetown Road in Boston, was charged with one count of murder (class A felony), one count of operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs, first offense (class B misdemeanor), and one count of being a persistent felony offender in the first degree.

  • School board elects to keep tax rate the same

    Editor's Note: Washington County PVA Fran Carrico pointed out to The Sun this morning that a number of Washington County citizens have Harrodsburg addresses. The Sun wishes to clarify this information, as two people quoted in the article are listed as having Harrodsburg addresses. The Sun will print this clarification in next week's edition.

    Washington County dodged a tax increase when the Washington County Board of Education voted 3-2 to keep its tax at the compensating rate of 58.9 cents on $100 of real and personal property last week.

  • Edelen has positive experience at GSP

    Hannah Edelen had to make a decision.

    She had been dreaming of becoming a national officer for FCCLA, or Family, Career and Community Leaders of America, since she was a freshman in high school. But after she found out she had been accepted into the Governor’s Scholars Program, she had to choose between the two life-altering opportunities because there was a conflict in the two programs’ schedules.

    In the end, she chose to attend GSP, and after looking back on her time this summer, she knows that she made the right choice.

  • McRay commissioned as national bank examiner

    Arthur Clinton “Clint” McRay, 27, a Springfield native, was recently commissioned a national bank examiner by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

    According to the group’s website, “The OCC charters, regulates, and supervises all national banks and federal savings associations as well as federal branches and agencies of foreign banks. The OCC is an independent bureau of the U.S. Department of the Treasury.”