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Local News

  • Fiscal court moves forward to look at fiber optic options

    Washington County Fiscal Court voted to take the next step into looking at a franchise agreement, which could bring fiber optic cables into the county.

    Brooks R. Herrick, an attorney with Dinsmore & Shohl, in Louisville, and Ryan Bell, a senior manager at Bluegrass Cellular, presented the agreement during the court’s regularly scheduled meeting Friday morning.

  • WCHS places fifth in state

     

    Music filled the air as the Washington County Commander Band marched to the beat and placed fifth out of 16 bands in the in the Class AA division of the Kentucky Music Educators Association state semifinals Saturday afternoon.

    The Commanders performed “The Yellow Wallpaper” in Elizabethtown and topped other schools in the contest, but narrowly missed out on the opportunity to play at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium in the state finals Saturday night.

  • Jury sumonses mailed out

    A select group of people in Washington County will be receiving important information in their mailboxes.

    Washington County Circuit Clerk JoAnn Mudd-Miller has sent off jury duty notifications to 1,000 people in Washington County, and the forms must be returned as soon as possible.

    “Jury duty is where you sit on different kinds of cases,” Mudd-Miller said. “Civil criminal, mental health; you’re a part of a jury of their peers.”

  • Gaona publishes bilingual book

    Lauren Gaona is a busy mom, and teaching lessons to her 4-year-old daughter, Aracelli, is not always an easy task.

    Recently Gaona used one of her favorite hobbies to help get an important message through to Aracelli.

  • Safe Schools Week runs for 17 years in county

    Students and staff at Washington County Schools raised awareness on tensions in the hallway for Safe Schools Week.

    Jesse Mattingly, the Family Resource and Youth Centers coordinator at Washington County Elementary School, said the program has run consistently for the last 17 years.

    “Safe Schools Week was created to raise awareness and to improve safety in our schools by educating students, staff, and our community regarding bullying prevention, conflict resolution and relationship building,” Mattingly said.

  • Enough is enough

    I was walking through my local department store a couple of weeks ago when I came across something I wasn’t expecting.

    Christmas stuff.

    In early of October.

    Yes, before Halloween.

    Everyone who’s watched “A Charlie Brown Christmas” will recall the time Charlie Brown was trying to sell Christmas wreaths before Thanksgiving.

    As I recall, at least one character slammed their door in ol’ Chuck’s face, telling him it wasn’t even Thanksgiving.

  • Lincoln Dinner hosted in Springfield

    A number of politicians came to Springfield for the Washington County Republican Women’s Club second annual Lincoln Dinner in Springfield Thursday night.

    According to the club’s president, Jeana Crouch, the dinner was inspired by a similar one in a neighboring county.

    “Our dinner got its start last year because a couple of us went to a Nelson County Lincoln dinner and we were impressed,” Crouch said. “We thought this was something we would like to do here, because Washington County had never had a Lincoln dinner before.”

  • Council discusses sidewalk repiars

    Springfield City Council weighed the concrete facts about Springfield’s sidewalks Oct. 10.

    At the council’s regularly scheduled meeting, a representative from Concrete Technology Inc. went over the city’s options when it comes to refinishing sidewalks on Main Street. Troy Wilkerson of CTI met with several council members before the meeting to assess the sidewalks and find out what options there are regarding renovations.

  • Fiber optic internet could come to county

    The county is considering bringing information to the community at the speed of light.

    County officials, along with a committee dedicated to looking at the issue, are looking into what it would take to bring fiber optic cables into the community, and what it would mean for businesses and consumers.

    The cables, which allow information to be transmitted at the speed of light, would vastly increase internet speeds locally and provide both businesses and the average consumer a boost in speed and reliability.

  • National Business Women's Week

    This week is National Business Women’s Week, and members of the local Business and Professional Women organization are reflecting on the progress made over the years.