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Local News

  • Getting started, changing paths, starting over

    By Stevie Lowery

    Landmark News Service

     

    Felicia Hazelwood, 41, of Lebanon is on her way to becoming a certified medical assistant and making a better life for herself and her nine-year-old son.

    Kambron Hayden, 19, of Springfield is working part-time at Barber Cabinets while also going to college to earn his industrial maintenance degree.

  • Cattle auctions hit the web

    With the thick and heavy smell of livestock in the air, and the rolling, silver tongue of an auctioneer, folks at the Washington County Livestock Center have been able to integrate the centuries old art of a cattle auction into the 21st century.

    “They are plum, plum fancy,” Jim Gibson, manager of the internet division at WCLC, yelled at the top of his lungs while talking to a crowd of 50 or more people and to a potential buyer on the phone.

  • Sisters start awarenees campaign

    The sisters at St. Catharine Motherhouse are working to educate the public on human trafficking, gun violence and more.

    The sisters, who invite the public to join them, discussed human trafficking and how it affects Kentucky last week.
    Sisters Juanita Carrigan, Rose Marie Cummins and Terry Wasinger are members of a committee at the motherhouse called Just Peace Action Committee.

    “We wanted our sisters to get really involved with things that happen,” Wasinger said.

  • Bourbon archeology exhibit to open Friday at opera house

    The Phil Simms Museum in downtown Springfield will be transformed for one month, starting Sept. 1 when the Bourbon Archeologist – Nicolas Laracuente – comes to town.

    According to Springfield Tourism Director Stephanie McMillin, the museum will be the Bourbon Archeology Exhibit, and it will host a number of free events in September.

    “It’s a really well-laid out exhibit,” she said.

  • Springfield native safe after hurricane

    Hurricane Harvey has struck the state of Texas, and one Springfield native said the rain and winds have pummeled power and phone lines into submission.
    Tracy Carrico, brother of J.B. Carrico, lives in a northeast Houston suburb and has been stuck in his flooded neighborhood since Saturday. He told The Sun Monday afternoon via cellphone that the hurricane dumped 24.8 inches of rain in his area. No one’s been hurt by wind damage, and he’s remaining positive about the situation.

  • Library will not raise taxes

    The Washington County Public Library will not be raising its tax rates this year, despite the construction of its new building.

    “We are not taking further income in,” Tara O’Hagan, the director of the library said at Friday’s Washington County Fiscal Court meeting. “We have budgeted well enough that we can go with what we’ve made to pay our bills, and still pay off our loan.”

  • Taylor is tops as Commanders cruise to victory

    The Washington County boys’ golf team continued its winning ways at My Old Kentucky Home State Park last week.

    The Commanders took on host Bethlehem High School on Wednesday, and Landon Taylor led the way with the low score of the event as he shot a 38 to lead his team to a win.

    Overall, Washington County won the match 170-181.

    Drew Yates was close behind Taylor, shooting a 40, and carding the second-best score in the match. Grant Satterly shot a 45, and Logan Wilson shot a 47.

  • Commanderettes top Nelson for first win

    Washington County made quick work of Nelson County Monday night, picking up its first volleyball win of the season.

    Getting out of the gate with a pair of losses might be concerning to some coaches, but John Rogers knew his team was playing some top-level competition early on as they faced two of the better teams in the 5th Region.

  • 8/23/17 Briefs

    Ongoing

    Volunteers Needed

    Volunteers are needed at the Lincoln Legacy Museum. If you have any free time, even a couple of hours would be greatly appreciated. Call Lena at (859) 336-3232.

     

    Addiction Counseling

  • Keeping the 'Mean Man' away

    With my arm draped around my almost 5-year-old grandson, I draw him close as he munches on his cheese burger. We’re nestled in a booth at his favorite fast food restaurant.

    Then, his question: “PopPop, you won’t let any mean man get me, will you?” 

    I know why he asks.