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Local News

  • Jets Over Kentucky is next week

    Whoosh!

    The sound of jet engines will fill the air when approximately 200 people come to the Lebanon-Springfield Airport to fly in the 13th annual Jets Over Kentucky next week.

    According to the event’s organizer, Lewis ‘The General” Patton, it’s expected to be the largest remote controlled jet show he’s put on to date.

    “We are very satisfied,” Patton said. “This is the world’s largest jet event.”

  • Keeping kids full in the summer

    Tyler Brown

    Staff Writer

    No child in Washington County has to worry about going hungry during the summer, thanks to the summer feeding program sponsored by the Washington County School district. 

    The program has been in place since before current food service director Regina Hood took over eight years ago, saying they serve children of all ages across the county.

    “It is for children of any age from 2 to 18, and it is open to any child in the community,” Hood said.

  • School board saves money by switching insurance carriers

    The Washington County Board of Education switched insurance carriers June 19 and pocketed a hefty savings for taxpayers.

    After receiving bids from insurance companies, the board chose to take the lowest bidders for property and liability insurance, workers compensation insurance, a fidelity bond and base plan for all students plus catastrophes.

  • Fourth of July celebration is Monday

    Springfield will soon be bustling again for Independence Day with its 17th annual Fourth of July Celebration event Monday, July 3. Springfield Main Street Promotions Committee member Nell Haydon said the event is always a big event that draws people from across Washington County.

    “It’s really a great celebration and we always have a great crowd,” Haydon said. “It’s grown by leaps and bounds over the years.”

  • Six indicted by grand jury

    Six people were indicted by a Washington County grand jury.

  • Fighting for one another

    Cancer comes in a variety of ways and affects each person differently. One Springfield family of three, Karen Purdom and her parents, Earl and Wilma Grigsby, has had not one, but three separate cases of cancer, and all are surviving to this day.

    “We have a lot of cancer in our family,” Karen Purdom said.

    Each year, the number of new cases of cancer is around 455 per 100,000 men and women each year, according to the National Cancer Institute, and the number of cancer deaths is approximately 171 per year. 

  • Relay for Life raises more than $70,000 in total

    More than $13,000 was raised to fight cancer at the Lebanon-Springfield Airport on Saturday.

    Relay for Life teams from both Washington and Marion counties came together for their cause during the joint event, which ran from noon to midnight. 

  • Armed robbery at Dollar General

    The Dollar General store on KY 555 was robbed at gunpoint on June 20 and the person who’s responsible is still at large. 

    According to Springfield Police Chief Jim Smith, a man wearing a hoodie, sunglasses and gloves entered the store at approximately 9:22 a.m. Tuesday morning and pointed what appeared to be a handgun at the store’s cashier. Smith said the employee gave the suspect approximately $100 out of the register. 

  • High winds strike county

    High winds ripped through the country Friday evening, which caused damage to buildings and downed multiple trees.

    “I was devastated,” Joyce Hardin said. 

    Hardin, who lives on Mclain Road in Springfield lost 12 trees to the winds, with one of them smashing through her carport. 

    “I’m still coping, but it’s a lot more emotional than I thought,” Hardin said.

    Her late husband, Scott, had planted all the trees that were destroyed in the storm.  

  • A good man

    Every now and then someone dies in a community and it’s never quite the same.

    Johnnie Hardin was one of those people. 

    He was more than a man who spent a lifetime in the grocery business.

    Mr. Hardin was a much beloved part of this small town community.

    He was in my dad’s highest words of praise, “a good man.“

    Here’s a little story that to me sort of sums up the type of life that Mr. Hardin lived.

    It was about 50 years ago.