.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Sansbury has new administrator

    The Sansbury Care Center recently welcomed a new member to its staff. 

    Pamela Brooks, the center’s new administrator. She said she was very pleased and honored with the opportunity to join Sansbury and is looking forward to serving its residents and the surrounding community.

    “I’m very blessed to have gotten this position here at Sansbury,” she said.

  • Toyotomi completes expansion phase

    Nick Schrager

    Editor

    Toyotomi is nearing the end of a three-year project, but it isn’t quite through just yet.

    The Springfield manufacturer, which was incorporated in 1998 and began production in 2000, recently completed another part of its expansion project and will add more jobs in the community.

    According to Craig Miller, the vice president of administration at Toyotomi, the project was started because of new business the plant received and will begin supplying this month. 

  • Taking it one day at a time

    Nick Schrager

    Editor

    William A. “Billy” Webb is a sick man, but he’s not letting the illness or stress bring him down. 

    The 62-year-old, who was diagnosed with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in 2011, is all smiles, even when recalling the worst moments of the cancer that affects him to this day.

    “It’s one disease you just deal with and go on,” Billy said, “and eventually it’ll do me in, but until then, I’m going to laugh.”

  • Former councilman passes away

    Johnnie Hardin, a long-serving Springfield City Councilman, has passed away.

    Hardin passed away June 15 at the Bluegrass Hospice Care Center in Lexington. He’s known for his time on the Springfield City Council, as well as spending more than 50 years in the grocery business here.

    Springfield Mayor Debbie Wakefield remembered Hardin as a dedicated soul who loved the city and the people he served. 

  • Free meals coming to high school students

    Students at Washington County High School and Commander Academy will soon have the option of receiving a hot meal at no cost.

    Washington County Schools Superintendent Robin Cochran said the high school and academy will join Washington County Elementary School, Washington County Middle School and North Washington School this fall in the Community Eligibility Provision program. The program is part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and schools are reimbursed for providing breakfast and lunch free of charge.

  • Heavenly Tresures gives back to community

    Nick Schrager

    Editor

    Heavenly Treasurers Presbyterian Mission Store in Springfield is helping people in need, one sale at a time. 

    The store, which is run by the Springfield Presbyterian Church, operates by selling donated goods and putting the profits back into the community.

    Beverly Bonzo and Zoie Covert run the store on Main Street, which is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  • Relay for Life is June 24

    Stevie Lowery

    Landmark News Service

    The face of Relay for Life in Marion and Washington counties is changing in a big way this year, but the motivation behind the event remains the same: to raise money for cancer research to possibly find a cure.

    For the past 20 years, local Relay for Life events have been very much the same thing year in and year out. And, as a result, fewer people were attending.

  • District hires Hutchins as new principal

    Washington County Schools

    A former Washington County Commanderette is returning as the high school’s new principal.

    According to Washington County Schools Superintendent Robin Cochran, Malissa “Missy” Hutchins of Harrodsburg has been named principal of Washington County High School.

  • Training to Protect and Serve

    It was like something that came straight out of someone’s worst nightmare.

    Springfield K-9 officer Nick Holmes carefully made his way into a nondescript building and through the halls with his patrol rifle. Step by step, he tiptoed around the body of a victim as the loud crack of gunshots echoed from deeper within, getting louder with each passing breath.

    Without warning, a woman who came running for help was grabbed across the chest by a gunman and used as a human shield.

  • Downs is named Distinguished Young Woman

    It ended with a crowd swarming to catch a closer look – and maybe photo of – 2018’s Distinguished Young Woman Saturday night.

    Sarah Downs, 17, daughter of Elaine and the late Stephen Downs, was given the title after winning awards for fitness, spirit, self expression, interviewing and preliminary scholastics during the 44th annual event.

    “Oh, my gosh,” Downs said. “I’m on top of the world right now.”

    She said she was elated when she heard her name called, but was nervous at the same time.